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Physics Department Colloquia


NOTE: All lectures are held in Spanagel 117 on Fridays at 1100 unless otherwise marked. View directions to NPS and campus map here. Public is invited. Contact Prof. Frank Narducci for campus access (frank.narducci@nps.edu).

 

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Thu. Oct 4, 2018

Increasing thermal response of Fiber Optic Sensing Systems (FOSS) at cryogenic temperatures

LT. Todd Coursey | Link to Abstract & Bio
Naval Postgraduate School

Special Place/Time: Spanagel 140 at 1400

At cryogenic temperatures, induced Bragg wavelength reflections become virtually unresponsive with change in temperature. The unresponsiveness is due to the fact that the thermal expansion coefficient and thermo-optic effects of Fiber Bragg Gratings become insignificant when silica fiber reaches extreme temperatures. Essentially, the fiber stops compressing. By increasing the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the inner fiber cladding and outer buffer coating, we can improve the thermal responsivity of the grating and continue to induce wavelength shifts.

Fri. Oct 12, 2018

Quantum Monte Carlo for molecular dipole moments

Dr. Peter Reynolds | Link to Abstract & Bio
Army Research Office

 

Fri. Oct 19, 2018

Clarinet acoustics: in search of quality markers for musical instruments

Prof. Whitney Coyle | Link to Abstract & Bio
Rollins College

 
The original design of the clarinet was conceived over 300 years ago not by scientists, but by musicians and artisans. As such, the complicated physics of the instrument has yet to be completely described. This presentation will cover the basics of clarinet acoustics then offer a glimpse into the acoustics research labs at Rollins College.

Fri. Oct 26, 2018

No colloquium: Discover NPS Day



Thu. Nov 1, 2018

Prandtl and the Minimum Induced Drag

Dr. Al Bowers | Link to Abstract & Bio
NASA Neil A Armstrong Flight Research Center

Special Place/Time: ME Auditorium at 1500

JOINT WITH MAE

For nearly a century Ludwig Prandtl’s lifting-line theory remains the standard tool for understanding and analyzing aircraft wings. The tool was thought to point to the elliptical spanload as the most efficient wing choice, and it has become the standard in aviation. Avian researchers have used the elliptical spanload virtually since its introduction. Yet research in bird flight has generated increasing data incongruous with the elliptical spanload. In 1933 Prandtl published a little-known paper presenting a superior spanload: any other solution produces greater drag. We argue that this second spanload is the correct model for bird flight data. Based on research we present a unifying theory for superior efficiency and coordinated control in a single solution. Specifically, Prandtl’s second span load offers the only solution to three aspects of bird flight: how birds are able to turn and maneuver without a vertical tail; why birds fly in formation with their wingtips overlapped; and why narrow wingtips do not result in wingtip stall. We performed research using two experimental aircraft designed in accordance with the fundamentals of Prandtl’s second paper. We have validated the new spanload 1/ as an alternative for avian researchers, 2/ to demonstrate the concept of proverse yaw, and 3/ to offer a new method of aircraft control and efficiency.


Fri. Nov 2, 2018

How far away can people make earthquakes?

Prof. Emily Brodsky | Link to Abstract & Bio
University of California Santa Cruz

 

Fri. Nov 9, 2018

Introduction to EM brushguns

Dr. Yuri Dreizin | Link to Abstract & Bio
General Electrodynamics International LLC

 

Invented about six years ago, EM brushguns differ from railguns in several ways, not only structurally, but, more fundamentally, in the manner they accelerate their projectiles


Fri. Nov 16, 2018

Feynman's lost lecture: A book report

Prof. Andres Larraza | Link to Abstract & Bio
Naval Postgraduate School

 

Fri. Nov 23, 2018

No colloquium: Happy Thanksgiving!



Thu. Nov 29, 2018

AEGIS Development (Part 1)

Lockheed Martin | Link to Abstract & Bio

US Citizens Only.

The briefing will be at the SECRET/NOFORN level.

Please note special time/place; Glasgow 102 at 1200.


Thu. Nov 29, 2018

AEGIS Development (Part 2)

Lockheed Martin | Link to Abstract & Bio

US Citizens Only.

The briefing will be at the SECRET/NOFORN level.

Please note special place/time: Glasgow 102 at 1500.


Fri. Nov 30, 2018

No colloquium: Student Defenses



Fri. Dec 7, 2018

Challenges of Using Plasma Armature EM Launchers for Achieving Muzzle Velocities in Excess of 5 km/s

Prof. David Wetz | Link to Abstract & Bio
University of Texas at Arlington

 

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