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Global Connections Speaker Dr. Aila Matanock on Electing Peace: From Civil Conflict to Political Participation
Date: August 1, 2018 to August 1, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

The NSA Department presents the latest Global Connections speaker, Dr. Aila M. Matanock, University of California, Berkeley, at noon on 1 August 2018. Settlements to civil conflict sometimes contain clauses enabling the combatant sides to participate as political parties in post-conflict elections. In her 2017 book Electing Peace, Dr. Matanock presents a theory to explain both the causes and the consequences of these provisions. She draws on new cross-national data on electoral participation provisions, case studies in Central America, and interviews with representatives of all sides of the conflicts. She shows that electoral participation provisions, nonexistent during the Cold War, are now in almost half of all peace agreements. Moreover, she demonstrates that these provisions are associated with an increase in the chance that peace will endure, potentially contributing to a global decline in civil conflict, a result that challenges prevailing pessimism about post-conflict elections. Dr. Matanock’s theory and evidence also suggest a broader conception of international intervention than currently exists. She identifies how these inclusive elections can enable external enforcement mechanisms and provide an alternative to military coercion by peacekeeping troops in many cases.

 

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Guest Speaker: Dr. Robert Springborg on Dilemmas Confronting Egypt
Date: June 7, 2018 to June 7, 2018
Time: 1200-1250
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 322

Former NSA Professor, and leading expert on Egypt, Dr. Springborg will discuss his new book Egypt and how the dilemmas are concerning the state. He has worked as a consultant on Middle East governance and politics for the United States Agency for International Development, the US State Department, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and various UK government departments, including the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Ministry of Defence and the Department for International Development. He has advised various intelligence organizations in the United States as well as served as expert witness in courts in the UK and Australia on criminal, civil and immigration cases.

 

To read more about his book, please click here.
 

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Global Connections Speaker: Dr. Julie Chernov Hwang on Why Terrorists Quit
Date: May 31, 2018 to May 31, 2018
Time: 1200-1300
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

As part of the Global Connections Speaker Series, Dr. Julie Chernov Hwang of Goucher College will give a talk to on her book Why Terrorists Quit: The Disengagement of Indonesian Jihadists on 31 May 2018 in Glasgow Hall, Room 322 from 1200–1330. In Why Terrorists Quit, Dr. Chernov Hwang answers the question of why do hardline terrorists decide to leave their organizations and quit the world of terror and destruction. In her talk, Dr. Chernov Hwang will share what she learned over six years and more than one hundred interviews with former and current leaders and followers of radical Islamist groups in Indonesia. She will discuss the reasons why they rejected physical force and extremist ideology, the impact of public initiatives designed to encourage radicals to disengage and the lives of five radicals from various groups seeking to establish trends, ideas and reasons for why radicals might quit terrorism. 

 

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Global Connections Series: Joshua Busby, Climate Security
Date: April 26, 2018 to April 26, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 322

On Thursday, 26 April, The Department of National Security Affairs will be hosting Dr. Joshua Busy, Associate Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. In his talk titled The Security Consequences of Climate Change, Professor Busby will focus on how can climate change affect national security, drawing on his scholarship and work as an investigator in two Department of Defense-funded research initiatives on Africa and Asia. Dr. Busby will review the state of the evidence to date.

To learn more about Dr. Busby, please click here.

 

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Brown Bag Event: U.S. Role in UN Peacekeeping
Date: April 11, 2018 to April 11, 2018
Time: 1200-1300
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 386

Brown Bag Event

 

On Wednesday, 11 April 2018, The Department of National Security Affairs will be hosting CDR David Van Brunt (USN), a member in the U.S. Military Observer Group, and Deputy Chief of Operations at United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO), United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) Operations Coordinator (OPSCO). CDR Van Brunt will be discussing about the U.S. role in UN Peacekeeping, the U.S. Government (USG) whole of government process, missions in which U.S. Service-members were deployed, the intricacies with UN Peacekeeping (roles, actions, other agencies and elements within the UNCT, etc.), and the opportunities for TDY deployment into a UN mission.

 

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Dr. Assaf Moghadam: Nexus of Global Jihad: Cooperation among Contemporary Terrorist Actors
Date: April 3, 2018 to April 3, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

At a noon talk on 3 April 2018, Dr. Assaf Moghadam will discuss his new book Nexus of Global Jihad, which explores the evolution of cooperation among an increasingly diverse spectrum of terrorist actors, including states, organizations, networks, and terrorist entrepreneurs, as well as the implications for counterterrorism theory and policy. He’ll identify types of terrorist actors, the nature of their partnerships, and the environments in which they prosper to explain global jihadist terrorism's ongoing success and resilience.

Dr. Assaf Moghadam is an Associate Professor and Director of the MA Program in Government at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel, currently on leave from the IDC until the fall of 2019. He is Director of Academic Affairs at the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT), a fellow at the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point (CTC), and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science at Columbia University. He is a contributing editor for the journal Studies in Conflict & Terrorism and the book review editor for the journal Democracy & Security. He has authored or edited five books on terrorism and political violence, including Nexus of Global Jihad: Understanding Cooperation among Terrorist Actors (Columbia University Press, 2017) and the award winning The Globalization of Martyrdom: Al Qaeda, Salafi Jihad, and the Diffusion of Suicide Attacks (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008).

 

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Dr. Maria Rost Rublee: Nuclear Norms in Flux
Date: April 2, 2018 to April 2, 2018
Time: 1200-1300
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

On 2 April 2018 from 1200-1300, the NSA Department will host Dr. Maria Rost Rublee of Monash University in Melbourne. She will give a talk titled "Nuclear Norms in Flux." Today, nuclear politics seem more disquieting than ever, from negotiating the Nuclear Weapon Ban Treaty to North Korea’s operationalization of its nuclear program.  In this talk, Dr. Rublee will discuss the deeper changes in the normative underpinnings of global nuclear governance, as well as the possible consequences for nuclear nonproliferation and prevention of nuclear war. 

Dr. Maria Rost Rublee is an associate professor at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia and Chair of the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association (ISA). Her work has been published in a variety of international journals, including International Studies Review, Contemporary Security Policy, Comparative Political Studies, Pacific Focus, and the Nonproliferation Review.  Rublee has received grants from the United States Institute of Peace, the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the ISA, the Asia New Zealand Foundation, and the Japan Foundation. Her book, Nonproliferation Norms: Why States Choose Nuclear Restraint, received the Alexander George Book Award for best book in political psychology.

 

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Global Connections Series: Mia Bloom, Children in Terrorism
Date: March 5, 2018 to March 5, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 322

On Monday, 05 March 2018, NSA will host Dr. Mia Bloom from Georgia State University for the Global Connections Speaker Series. Dr. Bloom will give a talk about How Children Become Involved in Terrorist Organizations.

To learn more about Dr. Bloom, please click here.

 

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Global Connections Series: Mai Hassan, Security Institutions in Kenya
Date: February 22, 2018 to February 22, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

On 22 February 2018, NSA will host Dr. Mai Hassan from University of Michigan for the Global Connections Speaker Series. Dr. Hassan will give a talk titled Security Institutions in Kenya.

 

To know more about Dr. Mai Hassan, click here.

 

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Brown Bag: John Hopkins, How Nuclear Weapons Ended WWII
Date: February 8, 2018 to February 8, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 322

On Thursday, 08 February 2018, Dr. John Hopkins will give a lecture regarding The Role of Nuclear Weapons in Ending World War II. He will be talking specifically about the U.S. view of and Japanese perception of the nuclear strikes.

 

Brief background on Dr. John Hopkins -

Dr. Hopkins is a nuclear physicist and former Associate Director of Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), where he oversaw LANL's nuclear weapons program. Throught this period, Dr. Hopkins was involved in national security policy issues. He was a visiting scholar at the University of California's Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation where he edited a 1994 book on the nuclear policies of Britain, France, and China. Dr. Hopkins is the coauther (with Barbara Germain Killian) of a comprehensive history of the first decade of nuclear testing in Nevada. Dr. Hopkins has served on governmental and international boards and panels and is a former member of the Chief of Naval Operations' (CNO) Executive Panel. He has been a technical advisor to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in Washington and in Geneva. Dr. Hopkins has worked closely with the State, Energy, and Defense Departments and has participated in numerous special programs for the U.S. Government.

 

The lecture is scheduled from 1200-1330 in Glasgow Hall, Room 322. Students with classess at 1300 are welcome to depart at 1255.

 

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Global Connections Series: Brent Durbin, Intelligence Reform
Date: January 17, 2018 to January 17, 2018
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 322

On 17 January 2018, NSA will host Dr. Brent Durbin from Smith College for the Global Connections Speaker Series. Dr. Durbin will give a talk titled after his book by the same name, The CIA and the Politics of U.S. Intelligence Reform. In his talk, Durbin will discuss why intelligence reform and oversight are so difficult, and how the peculiar politics of U.S. intelligence undermine America's national security and the civil liberties of its citizens.

 

To read more about Dr. Durbin, click here.

To read more about Dr. Durbin's book, click here.

 

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Global Connections Speaker Series: Dr. Peter Krause
Date: October 23, 2017 to October 23, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Rm. 322

 

On 23 October 2017, NSA will host Dr. Peter Krause from Boston College for the Global Connections Speaker Series. Dr. Krause will give a talk titled after his book by the same name, Rebel Power: Why National Movements Compete, Fight, and Win. In his talk, Krause will discuss why some national movements have independent states today (Israelis and Algerians), while others do not (Kurds and Palestinians. Using evidence gathered from fieldwork, archival research, and more than 150 interviews with participants who participated in four national movements (Palestinian, Zionist, Algerian, and Irish), the author will also provide and support his theory regarding the causes of terrorism.

 

To read more about Dr. Krause, click here.

To read more about his book, click here.

 

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Dr. Steven Cook: Whatever Happened to the Arab Spring?
Date: October 11, 2017 to October 11, 2017
Time: 1200-1300
Location: Glasgow Hall, RM 322

More than half a decade after people across the Middle East poured into the streets to demand change, hopes for democracy in the region have all but disappeared in a maelstrom of violence and renewed state repression. In his talk, Dr. Steven A. Cook, the author of False Dawn: Protest, Democracy, and Violence in the New Middle East and Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, will explain how those moments of empowerment, freedom, and dignity that began in places like Tunisia’s Sidi Bouzid and Egypt’s Tahrir Square turned out differently than most observers expected. According to Dr. Cook in False Dawn, “Looking back, it all seems dream-like. . . . Egypt’s Facebookers and bloggers, Mohammed al-Bouazizi, Khaled Said, Tahrir Square, brave Libyan fighters advancing on Tripoli, the Girl in the Blue Bra, and Gezi Park’s girl in the red dress are of a recent but seemingly distant past—a gauzy sequence of determination, defiance, hope, and activism that has not been extinguished as much as eclipsed by political uncertainty, instability, and at times unspeakable violence.” 

For Dr. Cook’s bio, click here

 

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Global Connections Speaker Series: The Streetlight Effect in Security Studies and International Relations
Date: September 6, 2017 to September 6, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

Scholars of security studies are well poised to answer the question: “What do we know about war?” They are less self-reflective about a related question: “What wars do we know about?” Scholars lavish attention on some conflicts while others are relegated to the dustbin of history. This likely has important consequences not just for the bounded nature of our scholarly understanding of conflict and conflict processes, but also for the mental models that inform policymakers’ and practitioners’ day-to-day work.

In this talk as part of the Global Connections Speaker Series, Dr. Hendrix discusses the powerful influence of the “streetlight effect”—the tendency of scholars to focus on particular questions and cases for reasons of convenience and career opportunities, rather than theoretical importance or practical relevance—on security studies and international relations scholarship. The streetlight effect has led scholars and policymakers to focus on particular countries and conflicts at the expense of others, resulting in a biased state of knowledge about conflict processes and outcomes. The talk concludes with recommendations for addressing gaps in both our practical and theoretical knowledge.

For Dr. Hendrix's bio, click here.

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Global Connections Speaker Series: Dr. Jakub Grygiel
Date: August 7, 2017 to August 7, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

In his talk, John Hopkins's Dr. Jakub Grygiel will explore the revisionists who are probing the periphery of U.S. power, careful to avoid a direct confrontation but curious to test the resilience of the American order. Their probing aims to break the alliance system built by the U.S. over the past century along the Eurasian rimland. How the U.S. responds in the next years will shape the behavior of U.S. allies and competitors, and decide the future of American security.

Dr. Jakub Grygiel is the George H.W. Bush Associate Professor at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Great Powers and Geopolitical Change.

 

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Safe Passage: The Transition from British to American Hegemony
Date: July 12, 2017 to July 12, 2017
Time: 1200–1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

Kori Schake is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. In her talk, “Safe Passage: The Transition from British to American Hegemony,” she will discuss how history records only one peaceful transition of hegemonic power: the passage from British to American dominance of the international order. What made that transition uniquely cooperative and nonviolent? Does it offer lessons to guide policy as the United States faces its own challengers to the order it has enforced since the 1940s? To answer these questions, Kori Schake explores nine points of crisis or tension between Britain and the United States, from the Monroe Doctrine in 1823 to the establishment of the unequal “special relationship” during World War II.

To attend please send an email to nsaevents@nps.edu

For a link to her book, Safe Passage: The Transition from British to American Hegemony, click here.

 

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Dr. Springborg to Examine Egypt: The Coming Collapse?
Date: July 11, 2017 to July 11, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: 122 Ingersoll Hall

On 11 July 2017 (Tuesday), Dr. Robert Springborg will examine the perilous state of Egypt today.  Based on his forthcoming book, Springborg argues that the accumulated failures under military rule, particularly since the coup that brought General Abd al-Fattah al-Sisi to power in 2013, have become so grave that the very nation-state is at risk of collapsing.  Given that Egypt as been a critical American ally in the Middle East for 40 years, these developments have potentially dire consequences for US national interests in the region.

Springborg is one of America’s top scholars on Egypt and the Middle East.  He retired as a Professor of National Security Affairs at NPS in 2013 and spent last year as a Visiting Scholar at Harvard.  He is currently a Visiting Professor at King College in London and Research Fellow at the Italian Institute of International Affairs.

To view his CV, click here.

 

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Global Connections Speaker Series: The Global Politics for Russian Islam
Date: May 11, 2017 to May 11, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

In his talk, Stanford's Dr. Robert Crews will explore the place of Islam in Russian foreign and domestic policy in the Middle East and Central Asia, and examine the role of Russia’s Muslim leadership in projecting Moscow’s authority at home and abroad. In seeking to expand Russian political and economic influence in Syria, Iran, Afghanistan, and the former Soviet states of Central Asia, the Kremlin has turned to the country’s Muslims elites—who claim leadership of a population of more than 20 million Russian Muslims—to serve as intermediaries between these domestic Muslim populations and Muslim countries along the southern frontiers of the former USSR. The talk will investigate the history and contemporary state of relations between the Russian government and the country’s Muslim elites and will highlight the centrality of Islam to ongoing controversies, domestic and international, about Russia’s role as a great power in global affairs.

More information about Dr. Robert Crews, click here.

 

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Governing the Faithful: State Management of Salafi Activity in the Sahel and East Africa
Date: April 25, 2017 to April 25, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

As part of the Global Connections Speaker Series, NSA will host Dr. Sebastian Elischer of the University of Florida on 25 April 2017. The literature on radical Islam stresses the significance of the Salafi creed for the radicalization of Muslims worldwide. This presentation examines how four states in the francophone Sahel – Niger, Chad, Mauritania, Mali – and two states in East Africa – Kenya and Uganda  –  have engaged with their Salafi communities since independence and what the long-term consequences of these strategies are. It finds that states that established institutional oversight mechanisms in the Islamic sphere effectively counteracted the spread of political and jihadi Salafism. This presentation examines the origins and the modus operandi of institutional regulation in areas of weak statehood. States that chose inaction, concessions, or repression enabled and contributed the rise of political and jihadi Salafism. These findings challenge conventional assumptions about the inability of weak states to establish state authority and shed new light on the complex relationship between African states and Islam.

For more information about Dr. Elischer, click here.


Dr. David Hendrickson Talks on Six Lessons from the Founding
Date: April 21, 2017 to April 21, 2017
Time: 1200-1330
Location: Glasgow Hall, Room 322

On 21 April 2017, 1200–1330 in GL-322, Professor David Hendrickson of Colorado College will give a talk titled “Six Lessons from the Founding: A Discourse on Power, Law, Independence, Union, Peace, and Liberty.” Professor Hendrickson is the author of twelve books, including The Republic in Peril: American Empire and the Betrayal of the Liberal Tradition (forthcoming in 2017 by Oxford University Press). As a long-time book review editor for Foreign Affairs, he has read and written about most significant issues in American debates over foreign policy, grand strategy, and national security. His first book, co-written with Robert Tucker, was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1990.

 

 


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