Master of Science (M.S.)

 

The Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES) Academic Program of the Naval Postgraduate School provides the MS student both fundamental and specialized courses in applied visual simulation technology, combat models and systems, and the application of quantatative analyses to training and simulation technology.
 
The MS program is a seven-quarter program (eight quarters for students requiring JPME) whose core covers the fundamentals of modeling and simulation, data analysis, visual simulation, intelligent systems, training and human performance.  These topics include object-oriented programming, probability, statistics, stochastic modeling, data analysis, acquistion and program management, artificial intellgence, computer graphics, simulation and training, and combat modeling systems.  The MS student demonstrates depth by the completion of a written thesis.

Requirements for Entry

Students entering the MS program in MOVES are required to have a baccalaureat degree, or the equivalent, with above average grades in mathematics (including differential and integral calculus), resulting in an APC of at least 325 is required for entry.  Undergraduate degrees in applied science or engineering are highly desirable.  Students lacking these prerequisites may be acceptable for the program, through the 12-week technical refresher or 12-week Engineering Science program, providing their undergraduate records and/or other indicators of success, such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), indicate an ability to work in quantitative subjects.  While previous academic or practical experience in modeling, virtual environments, and simulation is certainly helpful and can enhance the applicant's potential for admission, such experience is not a prerequisite.

Entry Date

MOVES is a seven-quarter (eight-quarters for students requring JPME) course of study starting annually in September.  Those requiring the 12-week refresher will begin study in July.  If further information is needed,  please contact the MOVES Academic Associate or the MOVES Program Officer for the curriculum.

 

Degree Requirements

The degree of Master of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation is awarded after satisfactory completion of a program which satisfies, as a minimum, the following degree requirements:

  1. At least 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which at least 12 quarter-hours must be at the 4000 level.
  2. Completion of an approved sequence courses constituting specialization in an area of Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation.
  3. Completion of an acceptable thesis in addition to the required course work.

Requirements for the MS in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements established by the sponsor for the curricular program.

Completion of the seven-quarter sequence of courses specified below is required to satisfy the Education Skills Requirements for the Navy 6202P code and Marine MOS 8825.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualfies an officer as a modeling, virtual environments, and simulation subspecialist with a Navy subspecialty code of 6202P or Marine Corps MOS 8825.
 

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)

The MOVES curriculum prepares students to b e the Department of Defense's experts in Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation.  They are able to provide both technical and managerial leadership in all areas of simulation development, sustainment, and application. Their rigorous technical background enables them to quickly adapt to rapidly evolving technical  landscape.

  1. Modeling and Simulation (M&S) Foundations: The graduate will understand the capabilities, limitations, history, terminology of the M&S domain. The graduate will understand the concepts and applicability of wargamming, simulation tools, conceptual models, statistical models, discrete modeling, artificial intelligence, physics-based modeling, visual representation, and data standards to complex problems within the military domain.  This understanding will be based on probability theory, calculus, linear algebra, and data analyst techniques that will enable the graduate to fully understand modeling of uncertainty and randomness within these complex domains. 
  2. M&S in the DoD: The graduate will have a thorough understanding of the DoD M&S organizations, current policies, and M&S trends at both the DoD and individual Service levels. Moreover, the graduate will understand and be able to apply the capabilities and limitations of simulations across the DoD M&S application domains.  In addition, the graduate will understand the process verification, validation and accreditation (VV&A), particulary current industry best practices.  Finally, the graduate will have a solid understanding of information assurance and cyber security plicies, organization, requirments, and vulnerabilities, with particular emphasis on who is  responsible for cyber security in the military structure  and how M&S interfaces with that structure. 
  3. Modes and Modeling Techniques: The graduate will understand the various modeling systems in current military use (e.g. queing theory, discrete event simulation, detection and engagement models, and environmental models) with an emphasis on ballistic, weapon, terrain, vegetation, cultural, and weather effects on military concepts (i.e. mobility, survivability, and firepower) that achieve military objectives. The graduate will be able to practically apply techniques (both designing and programming) such as: event graphs; aggregate versus entity-level modeling; weapons effect modeling (e.g., blast, thermal, acoustic); high fidelity, destructible terrian within a virtual 3D enviornment. The graduate will understand the state of  he art of abstract representations of culture, social relationships, and information structures in the military contenxt including human communciation and stability models in a political, military, economic, social, information, and infrastrcture (PMESII) environment. Furthermore, the graduate will understand how physics can be modeled at varying degrees of resolution and the tradeoffs inherent to more simpilified models.  Finally, the graduate will understand fundamentals of intelligent systems and machine learning in the context of agent-based systems.
  4. Simulation Software Development: The graduate will understand and have demonstrated the ability to: use systems engineering processes to specify operational, functional, and technical requirements; program and  analyze interface devices to include augmented realtiy un-occluded heads up displays (HUD) and motion capture. Additionally, they will be able to design and document conceptual models with the appropriate analysis of alternatives, and plan and execute both developmental and operational testing events in s upport of VV&A. 
  5. Military Appplications: The graduate will understand the capabilities and limitations of and have demonstrated the ability to apply M&S to training and analysis applications using simulations in current use by DoD Services, as  practical. This understanding will include task-condition-standards methodologies for skills and staff actions within the appropriate training environment, including interfacing with (C4I) systems. The graduate will be able to plan, prepare, execute, and conduct after-action review training exercises using human performance evaluation techniques that ensure positive training transfer occurs. In addiiton, the graduate will be able to apply analysis simulations to answer a commander's critical information  requirements, including via wargaming (both seminar and simulation supported).
  6. Simulation Interoperability: The graduate will understand and be able to design distributed simulations in a net-centric environment, while considering hardware and software requirements, simulation data, control data, voice data, and technical standards for connectivity.  In addition, the graduate will have a detailed understanding of simulation federations within LVC environments, with particular emphasis on capabilities, limitations, strengths, and weaknesses of modern single and mixed architectures.  The graduate's understanding will also include augmented reality, C4I simulation, basic networking architectures and communication protocols, and standards for data and communication networks as well as the technical development processes, and open-soruce standard capabilities and limitations' impacts on interoperatibliity. 
  7. Business Practices: The graduate will understand the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within that process.  Specifically, they will understand management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods, and functional area concerns.  The graduate will gain a program management perspective on the evolution and current state of: systems acquisition management; the system acquistion life  cycle; requirements analysis; contract managment; resource management; test and evaluation; user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling processes. 
  8. Thesis: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research and analysis in the area of M&S and proficiency in presenting the results in writing by means of a thesis appropriate curriculum. 

Course of Study

MOVES (399), First Year Matrix, All Students

Courses  
Refresher-if required (Summer)

CSR100
Refresher for Beginning Programming

MA2025
Bridge to Advanced Mathematics

 

MA1113
Single Variable Calculus I
MA1114
Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra 
 

 

Quarter 1
(Fall) 
CS2072
Fundamental Object Oriented Programming in JavaScript
OS3111
Probability and Statistics for HSI and MOVES
MA3042
Linear Algebra
MV3101
Introduction to Department of Defense Modeling and Simulation
MV2921
Introduction to MOVES
Quarter 2
(Winter) 
CS2173
Java as a Second Language
OS3113
Data Analysis for HSI and MOVES
MV3203
Graphical Simualtion
MV4002
Introduction to Computer Security
MV3922
Introduction to Virtual Environment Technology
Quarter 3
(Spring) 
MV3302
Introduction to Discrete Event Simulation Modeling
OS3112
Statistics & Design of Experiments
MV3202
Introduction to Computer Graphics
MV3923
Introduction to Research in MOVES
 
Quarter 4
(Summer) 
MV4025
Cognitive and Behavioral Modeling for Simulations
MV4002
Simulation and Training
MV4502
Simulation Devleopment Practicum
MV3500
Network Communmcations and Simulation
MV4924 
Current Topics in MOVES

 

CSR100 Refresher for Beginning Programming: (No credit) An introduction to computer algorithms; programs and hardware.  Using structured programming and stepwise refinement techniques, students receive classroom instruction plus design and test programs in the laboratory.  Computer projects of increasing difficutly are assigned.  This course is not graded. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)

MA113 Single Variable Calculus I: Review of analytic geometry and trigonometry, functions of one variable, limits, derivatives, and continutiy and differentiability; differentation of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions with applications to maxima and minima, rates differentials; product rule, quotient rule, chain rule; anti-derivatives, integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus; definite integrals, areas.  Taught at a rate of nine hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisites- None. (4 hours lecture)

MA1114 Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra: Topics in calculus inside applications of integration, special techniques of integrations, infinite series, convergence tests, and Taylor series.  Matrix algebra topics covered are: the fundamental algebra of matricies including addition, multiplication of matrices, multiplication of a matrix by a constant and column (vector) by a matrix; elementary matrices and inverses, together with the properties of these operations; solutions to mxn systems of linear algebraic equations using Gaussian elimination and the LU decomposition (without pivoting); determinants, properties of determinants; and a brief introduction to arithmetic of complex numbers and DeMoivre's theorem.  Taught at the rate of nine hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisite- MA1113. (4 hours lecture)

MV3101 Introduction to Department of Defense Modeling and Simulation: This course serves as an important overview course for all students enrolled in the MOVES curricula, in addition to other curricula at NPS.  It covers the origin, evolution, breadth and importance of DoD modeling and simulation (M&S), and the utilization of M&S in DoD system acquisition life cycle.  The course focuses on the functional areas of DoD M&S, which are: Training, Analysis, Acquisition, Planning, Test, and Evaluation.  This course is offered as SE3101. Prerequisites-None. (4 hours lecture)

MV2921 Introduction to Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation: This course is an introduction to the Modeling, Virutal Environments and Simulation discipline.  Topics include Combat Modeling, Networked Visual Simulation, Web-Based Simulation, Agents and Cognitive Modeling, Training Systems, Human Factors, Physically Based Modeling, and Optimization.  Graded Pass/Fail basis only.  Prerequisites-None. (2 hours lecture)

CS2072 Fundamental Object Oriented Programming in JavaScript: This course is an introductory course in program development techniques and the structured and object-oriented programming paradigms using JavaScript.  The topics covered include: problem-solving, documentation, control flow, native types and statements, operators, structures, functions, arrays, object-oriented programming, encapsulation, and VO. Weekly programming or written assignments will be assigned. Prerequisite-None. (4 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)
 
OS3111 Probability and Statistics for HSI and MOVES: Non-calculus based introduction to basic probability theory and statistics for the non-statistician.  Descriptive statistics and graphical techniques.  Probability rules including Bayes Rule and independence.  Discrete and continuous distributions (Boolean, geometric, binomial, exponential, normal).  Expected values, quantiles, variance, covariance, correlation. Expected values and variance of linear combinations of random variables, notably the sample mean.  Central Limit Theorem.  Student's t-distribution and test, nromalization (z-scores), confidence intervals, and introduction to hypothesis testing for the one sample data set, including categorical data.  Additional topics include paried designs, contingency tables and chi-squared test. Prerequisites-None. (4 hours lecture)
 
MA2025 Bridge to Advanced Mathematics: This course is a first course in discrete mathematics for students of mathematics and computer science.  Topics include propositional and predicate logic up to the deduction theorem, methods of mathematical profo, naive set theory, properties of functions and relations, mathematical induction, an introduction to divisibility and congruences, and introduction to enumerative combinatorics, and an introduction to graphs and trees.  Prerequisites-None. (4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)
 
SE3100 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering: Introduction to systems thinking and the processes and methods of systems engineering.  The course covers fundamentals of systems engineering and system architecting, requirements analysis, functional analysis and allocation, preliminary system archtecture, systems analysis, system design, and the basics of test and evaluation.  Various perspectives, from frameworks, processes, and standards such as DoD Architecture Framework (DODAF), DoD Joint Capabilities Integration and Devleopment System (JCIDS, EIA 632, ISO 15288, IEE 1471, and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) models, are presented. Students analyze case studies.  Students also use spreadsheet software for modeling and analyzing  requirements and conceptual design alternatives.  The course includes the applicaiton of fundamental systems engineering processes and methods to an integrative project, as well as development of communication skills through oral presentations and written reports. Prerequisites-None. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)
 
CS2173:Java as a Second Language: A first course in Java for students experienced in another programming language. Students learn to implement problem solutions using a procedural and object-oriented  langugage features of Java. Topics include: program structures and environment, arrays, exceptions, constructors, and finalizers, class extension, visibility and casting, overriding vs overloading,  abstract classes  and interfaces, files and streams, class loaders, threads and sockets. Programming projects provide students the opportunity to implement techniques covered in class. Prerequisite-Recent completion of  the complete series in another programming language course, or programming experience in another programming language.  (4 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)
 
OS3113 Data Analysis for HSI and MOVES: Introduction to common types  of data collection (sampling methods, surveys, observational studies, and experiments) and the link between data collection methods and data analytic procedures. Non-calculus based introduction to conduting statistical inference for estimation o f population parameters and hypothesis testing with common parametric methods (confidence intervals, z-tests, t-tests, ANOVA, regression, chi-square). Data sets and motivational examples are drawn from recent research relevant to HSI and/or MOVES. Prerequisites-None.  (4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)
 
MV3023 Artificial Intelligence for Simulations: Teaches the theory and techniques relevant to rapid construction of small to medium sized graphical simulations using existing simulation platforms, such as Delta3D, VBS2, Unreal, etcetera, including web browsers with plug-ins for Flash or X3D: For using as a stimulus for human performance experiments; as partial task trainers; as visualizations to support analysis; as testbeds for new hardware or software technology. Prerequisite-MV3230. (4 hours lecture; 1 hours lab)
 
MV3202 Introduction to Computer Graphics: This course provides a comprehensive overview of cyber security terminology, concepts, software, hardware, and policies.  It covers informational threats, vulnerabilities, risks and safeguards and shows how these safeguards establish the confidentiality, integrity, authenticity, availability and non-repudiation of information.  It addresses the protection of information using a combination of software and hardware mechanisms, while it is being processed and stored on computing platforms and transmitted across networsk.  This is the entry point (prerequisite) for all other Computer Security Track courses. Prerequisite-CS2011 or CS3030. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)
 
MV3922 Introduction to Virtual Environment Technology:  This course is an introduction to the technology used in virtual environments and discusses applications which use Virtual Environments.  It is intended to give the students an introduction to the items they are likely to use throughout the master's degree program in MOVES. Graded Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite-MV2921. (2 hours lecture)
 
MV3302 Introduction to Discrete Event Simulation Modeling: This course provides an introduction to Discrete Event Simuluation (DES) methodology, modeling, and analysis.  Use of DES formalism, such as Event Graph methodology, for design of models. Component-based implementation of event graph models on a platform such as Simkit. Use of simulation components for building models using composition.  DES modeling of movement and sensing. Random variate generation. Sample output analysis. Prerequisite-Java programming or permissiong of instructor; Basic probability and statistics at the level of OA3101 and OA3103. (4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)
 
OS3600 Introduction to Computer Security: This course provides a comprehensive overview of cyber security terminology, concepts, software, hardware, and policies.  It covers information threats, vulterabilities, risks and safeguards and shows how these safeguards establish the confidentiality, integrity, authenticity, availability and nonrepudiation of information.  It addresses the protection of information using a combination of softwared and hardware mechanisms, white it is being processed and stored in computing platofrms and transmitted across networks.  This is the entrypoint (prerequisite) for all Computer Security track courses. Prerequisite-CS2011 or CS3030. (4 hours lecture; 2 lab hours)
 
OS3112 Statistics and Design of Experiments: This course covers fundamentals of experimental design, analysis of categorical data, the general linear model, and regression. Students will learn how to set and analyze experiments using basic experimental design starting with two-sample methods and advancing to designs such as factorials, fractional factorias, and randomized block designs. Prerequisites-College Algebra and OS3111. (4 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)
 
MV3203 Graphical Simulation: Teaches the theory and tecniques relevant to rapid construction of small to medium sized grpahical simulations using existing simulation platforms, such as Delta3D, VBS2, Unreal, etcetra, including web browsers with plug-ins for Flash or X3D: For use as stimulus for human performance experiments; as partial task trainers; as visulaizations to support analysis; as testbeds for new hardware or softward technology. Prerequsite-MV3202. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)
 
MV3923 Introduction to Research in Modeling Virtual Environments & Simulation: This course will examine the currented and planned research of MOVES faculty in multiple fields of study.  The course is designed to support MOVES studetns in the selection of emphasis blocks and an area for thesis research.  Includes readings and exercises. Prerequisite-MV3922. (2 hours lecture)
 
 
 
MOVES (399), Second Year Matrix, All Students
 
COURSES  
Quarter 5
(Fall)

 
OA4655
Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling
 

MV4920

Advanced Topics in MOVES

MV4001

Human Factors of Virtual Environments

MV4503

Simulation Interoperability Practicum

MV4924
 Current Topics in  MOVES
Quarter 6
(Winter)

 

MV4657

Modeling and Simulation for Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR) Operations

MN3331* Principles of Acquistion and Program Managment MV4501 Simulation Application Practicum MV0810 Thesis Research
MV4924  Current Topics in MOVES
Quarter 7
(Spring)

 
MV0810
Thesis Research
MV0810
Thesis Research

OA4655

Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling

 

MV4460 Managment of Modeling & Simulation Development
MV-4924
Research Seminar in MOVES

SE3100 

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

           


MV4025 Cognitive and Behaviorial Modeling for Simulations: This course focues on the primary technologies used to model cognition and behavior in order to create agents that represent human beings in simulations.  Topics include the dominant technologies in use, the tools used to  support them, and their applicaiton to the  various capabilites  required of  an agent.  The modeling technologes covered include the production-system approaches commin in  artificial intelligence/cognitive science/psychology, as well as the finite-state, automata-inspired approaches that are part of engineering practice in computer-generated force simulations and the compuer entertainment industry.  The full scope of the modeling program will be addressed, from s ensation and perception through situation awarenss and action selection, to action execution.  Approaches to modeling communication and behavior moderators (e.g. experience, emotion, fatigue) will also be addressed. Prerequisites-CS3310.  (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)

MV4002 Simulation and Training: This course focuses on training issues in virtual environments (VEs). VEs have often been considered to be general purpose trainers.  however, systems are often built without an understanding of how to build a trainger that can verify that it improves subsequent performance without forming bad habits. or other reverse training artifacts.  This course will first investigate VE training systems from a theoretical perspective, focuing on learning, memory, and cognition.  From this framework, actual training systems will be studieed with the focus of  being an actual study of training transfer of a real training system.  Prerequisites-None.  (4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)

MV4502 Simulation Development Practicum: This course provides the students with the opportunity to work directly with a full scale, deployed combat simulation.  This class has two main objectives.  The first is to gain a deper understading of the inner structure of modern combat simulation systems.  This goes beyond just looking at conceptual descritptions of the componentes to looking at the implementaiton intracies that make such systems work.  The second is as a practicum to provide students experience with all of the processes involved in the development of simujlation software.  This includes requirements definition, test and evaluation and software design and implementatino. The intent is to have the students gain hands on experience in all aspects of these processes.  By looking at a depoloyed system that is being used by the Marine Corps and Army, the students will develop an appreciation for hte issues that are encountered in the real world that are often masked in purely pedagogical examples. Prerequisites- MV4025, MV3302. (2 hours lecture; 4 hours lab)

MV3500 Internetwork Communications and Simulation: An introduction to network communications in simujlation applications.  Topics include an introduction to the TCP/IP protocol stack; TCP/IP socket communicaitons, including TCP, UDP, and multicast; and protocol design issues, with empasis on Distributed Interactive Simulation and Higher Level Architecture. The emphasis will be on Windows and web-browser apoplications.  Prerequisites-CS2173. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)

MV4924 Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments & Simulation: The course is designed to provide breadth in MOVES not normally provided by other classroom material, as well as focus in major areas of MOVES.  Faculty and research staff attend class sessions, providing the opportunity to interact with a broad group once a week, and with the focused gropu of the student's choosing once a week. Course is expected to be repeated and is required of all MOVES studtens every quarter starting with the fourth quarter in the curriculum. Includes studetn presentations and readings.  Prerequisites-MV3923. (1 hour lecture; 1 hour lab)

OA4655 Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling: (Same as MV4655) This course covers the basic ools and concepts of joing combat modeling.  Botht eh science and the art are emphasized. Topics include: the role of combat modeling ananyses, taxonomies of models, an introduction to some important models and organizations, measure of effectivness, approaches to effectively using models to assist decition making, object-oriented approahces to designing entities to simulate, firing theory, one-on-one and few-on-few engagements, introduction to aggregated force-on-force modeling (including the basic Lanchest modeling and some of its derivatives), sensing algorithms, simulation entitiy deicion making, simulating C4ISR processe, terrain and movement algorithms, verification, validation, and accredidations (VV&A), stochastic versus determanistic representations, hierarchies of models, and variable resolution modeling.  The primary course objective is for your to understand the enduring fundamentals of how combat models are built and used to support deciion making.  This will be done, in part, through several small projects that will requires students to design, implement, and analyze models.   Prerequisites- Probability and Statistics (through third course in the sequence), familiarity with a programming language, Calculus, and concurrent instruction in computer simulation (e.g., OA3302) (4 hours lecture)

MV4920 Advancted Topics in Advanced Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation: Designed to support advanced group study of subject matter of special interest, dependent upon faculty availability.  Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope.  This course may be lecture-or-lab oriented, with prerequisites determined by the  instructor.  Students may repeate this course for credit with a different topic. Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.

MV4001 Human Factors of Virtual Environments: This course focuses on human factors issues in virutal environments (VEs).  While the similarities of VEs to the real workd can oftem make VE interfaces intuitive and easy to use, the difference between VEs and the real workd can often be the cuase of serious  performacep roblems and physical  inability to effectively use a system.  The design of effective  BE systems depends on an undersatnding of humans and their interaction with their environment.  Only then, can a VE system hope to achieve reasonable performace levesl and acceptai bility.  This course will survey the VE literature on issues of human performance, perception, cognition, multimodal interfaces, locomotion, wayfinding, object selection and maniulpulation, visualzation, simulatior sickness, and performace differences between individuals.  Prerequisites-None.  (4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)

MV4503 Simulation Interoperability Practicum: This course provides studetns with hands-on experience with the sissues around connecting live,  virtual,and constructive simulations into a single federation.  STudents will deepen their understanding High Level Architecture down to the Federation Object Model and Simulation Object Model level.  They will encounter data and timing incompatibility issues, and learn the tools and techniques currently used to resolve them.  They will develop a practical understanding of  information assurance requriements on simulation and how they can be addressed.  Prerequisites-MV3500. (2 hours lecture; 4 hours lab)

MV4924 Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments & Simulation: The course is designed to provide breadth in MOVES not normally provided by other classroom material, as well as focus in major areas of MOVES.  Faculty and research staff attend class  sessions, providing the opportunity to interact with a braod group once a week, and with a focused group of the studetn's choosing once a week.  Course is expected to be repeated and is required of all MOVES studemnts every quarter starting with their fourth quarter in the curriculum.  Includes student presentations and readings. Prerequisites-MV3923. (1 hour lecture;1 hour lab)

MV4657 Modeling and Simulation for Stability, Secuirty, Transition and Reconstruction (SSTR) Operations: The purpose of this course is to explore the challenges of modeling non-traditional combat for today's war fighters.  This course investigates issues, challenges, and opportunities for application of modeling and simulatio (M&S) to military support for Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR) operations.  The course considers applicaiton of M&S for SSTR from the perspectives of analysis, training, acquistion, and mission planning/rehearsal.  Students are given hands-on experience with current and emerging SSTR M&S simulations and computational tools. Prerequisites-MV4655. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)

*MN3331 Principles of Acquistion and Program Management: This course provides the student with an undersatnding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosopies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods  wihtin this process.  The course examines managment characteristiscs and compentencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and fucntional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationshipos will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program managment perspective, include the evolution and current state os stystems acquisition managmement, the sytem acquisition life cycyle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplies and activieies; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling.  Case studies are used  to analyze various acquistion issues.   Defense Acquistion Univerisity (DAU) has granted MN3331 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, ACQ 2013, PMT 251, PMT 257, BCF 102 and BCF 103. Prerequisites-None. (5 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)

*DoD students only.  Non-DoD students take GB3031 intstead.

MV4501 Simulation Application Practium: This course provides students with extensive laboratory experience applying simulations to address a defense capability gap using simulation-based system. The application domain will be selected from a representative simulation application domains (e.g. training, analysis, acquisition, experimentation).  Students will analyze a sepcified need, develop requirments, objectives, and standards of system and human performance, select a simulation platform, develop additional infrastructure and environments needed to accomplish identified needs and objectives, test their solution, analyze its effectiveness and define recommendations for potential system re-design.  Prerequisites-MV4002. (2 hours lecture; 4 hours lab)

MV0810 Thesis Research: MOVES thesis research.  (8 hours lab)

MV4924 Current Topics in Modeling, Virutal Environments & Simulation: The course is designed to provide breadth in MOVES not normally provided by other classroom material, as well as focus in major areas of MOVES.  Faculty and research staff attend class  sessions, providing the opportunity to interact with a braod group once a week, and with a focused group of the studetn's choosing once a week.  Course is expected to be repeated and is required of all MOVES studemnts every quarter starting with their fourth quarter in the curriculum.  Includes student presentations and readings. Prerequisites-MV3923. (1 hour lecture; 1 hour lab)

MV0810 Thesis Research: MOVES Thesis Research. (8 hours lab)

MV0810 Thesis Research: MOVES Thesis Research. (8 hours lab)

OA4604 Wargaming Applications: Wargaming has been an essential tool for mlitary planning and decision making for centuries.  A properly designed wargame provides a structred environment that allows military professionals to gain insight into complex military problems. The first half of the Wargaming Applications course teachs the fundamentals of wargming using a mix of lectures and practical exercises.  The second lahf of the course focuses on applying wargaming fundamentals to answer a DoD sponsor's real-life requirement.  Student gropus will design, devleop, conduct, and analyze a wargame to address a sponsor's needs.  Prerequisites-OA4655 or consent of instructor. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab)

MV4460 Management of Modeling & Simulation Development: The purpose o f this course is to prepare MOVES students to manage large-scale modeling and simulation projects.  The course traces the devleopment lifecycle of modeling and simulation systems, including bu tnot limtied to project management, measurement, lifecycle models, requirements, implementation, testing, verification, and deployment of large-scale systems typical of DoD acquisition.  Prerequisites-None. (4 hours lecture)

MV4924 Current Topcs in Modeling, Virtual Environments & Simulation:The course is designed to provide breadth in MOVES not normally provided by other classroom material, as well as focus in major areas of MOVES.  Faculty and research staff attend class  sessions, providing the opportunity to interact with a braod group once a week, and with a focused group of the studetn's choosing once a week.  Course is expected to be repeated and is required of all MOVES studemnts every quarter starting with their fourth quarter in the curriculum.  Includes student presentations and readings.  Prerequisites-MV3923. (1 hour lecture; 1 hour lab)


Program Officer

Eric Regnier, LCDR, USN

Code CS/32, Glasgow East, Room 309

(831) 656-7980, DSN 756-7980 

eric.regnier@nps.edu

 

Academic Associate

Chris Darken, Ph.D.

Code CS/Cd, Watkins Hall, Room 382

(831) 656-2095, DSN 756-2095

FAX (831) 656-7599

cjdarken@nps.edu