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UNDER CONSTRUCTION

We are revamping our Resources page! Meanwhile, find a few key resources below; we expect to have a super user-friendly Resources page for both resident and distance learning students in Fall 2017. Distance learners, please remember that we’re here to coach you, too. We love to hear from you. Make a coaching appointment today!

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Why write?

CNO Richardson has published an impassioned plea to all Navy personnel to make a rigorous habit of reading and writing, to benefit the Navy's mission (“Now Hear This – Read. Write. Fight” [with Lt. Ashley O'Keefe, USN], Proceedings Magazine, June 2016). He opens:

I want to revitalize the intellectual debate in our Navy. We all—officers, enlisted, and civilians—need to develop sound and long-term habits for reading and writing during the entire course of our careers. We must challenge our own assumptions, be informed by the facts, and be aware of the current context. We must commit to self-improvement, through formal schools and courses, and especially through self-education. I strongly encourage you to read, think, and write about our naval profession. Our Navy benefits from a vigorous intellectual debate.

His words work just as well as a justification for your presence, as students, at NPS. The Navy is a large, complex, and technologically-advanced organization. It can't function well unless all hands stay abreast of the issues related to their mission and think creatively and critically about the challenges our nation faces.

The CNO added sage comments that echo the philosophy we teach in the Graduate Writing Center:

Understand that you are accountable for your writing. You own what you write. So know your subject and the context surrounding your topic—do your research. Speak in your own voice. Be ready to defend your position. When you write, your ideas are going to be challenged and maybe harshly criticized. That is acceptable. Learn from it, and come back better.

Dmitry Filipoff, writing for the Center for International Maritime Security (“Operationalizing the CNO’s Call to Read and Write,” June 27, 2016), expands in detail on the CNO's article.

We encourage you to read both articles at the above links.

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Writing Resources

Click on the bars below to see a variety of useful sources. The listing of these sources—websites, books and other materials—are for the education and convenience of NPS students, faculty, and staff. These listings do not constitute an official endorsement or approval by the United States Navy, the Naval Postgraduate School, or the Graduate Writing Center.

This collection is intended to give you easily accessible overviews of critical areas of writing.
 
Abstracts Literature Reviews
Argumentation and Persuasion Logic and Analysis
Audience Numbers, Working with
Before You Write Organization
Bibliographies Paragraph Development
Choosing a Thesis Topic Passive/Active Voice
Citing the Work of Others Plagiarism
Clarity Punctuation
Concision Reading
Conclusions Research
Critical Thinking Revising and Editing
Data Presentation Sentence Structure
Dissertation Writing Survival Guides for Grad School
ESL Taking Notes
Evidence Technical/Scientific Report Writing
Executive Summaries Thesis Statements
Grammar Word Choice and Style
Group Writing Writer’s Block
Introductions Writing Process


Hold the cursor still over a heading below to read its brief description.

Abstracts

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Argumentation and Persuasion

  • Argument (Handout) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
  • Writing an Argument (Handout) UC-Riverside Graduate Writing Center.

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Audience

  • Audience (Handout) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
  • Professional Tone (PPT) Polytechnic Institute of NYU engineering course.

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Before You Write

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Bibliographies

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Choosing a Thesis Topic

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Citing the Work of Others

  • For citation guides, see the "Citation Styles" section of "Writing Resources."
  • Citations (Online guide) Dudley Knox Library.
  • How We Cite (Video; 2:06) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
  • Quotations (Handout) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
  • Writing with Sources: A Guide for Students, 2nd ed. (Book) Gordon Harvey, Hackett Publishing.

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Clarity

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Concision

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Conclusions

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Critical Thinking

   The Case Study Handbook: How to Read, Discuss, and Write Persuasively About Cases (Book) William Ellet, Harvard Business School Press.

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Data Presentation

    

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Dissertation Writing

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ESL

     Articles [of speech] (Handout) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.

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Evidence

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Executive Summaries

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Grammar

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Group Writing

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Introductions

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Literature Reviews

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Logic and Analysis

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Numbers, Working with

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Organization

  • Flow (Video; 2:01) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
  • Reverse Outline (Video; 1:49) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.

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Paragraph Development

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Passive/Active Voice

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Plagiarism

Punctuation

  • Also see the style guides under "Comprehensive Writing Guides."
  • Commas (Handout) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
  • Semi-colons, Colons, and Dashes (Handout) University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Writing Center.
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Reading

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Research

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Revising and Editing

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Sentence Structure

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Survival Guides for Graduate School

Taking Notes

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Technical/Scientific Report Writing

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Thesis Statements

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Word Choice and Style

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Writer's Block

 

 

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Writing Process

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Business Policy Analysis
Engineering Political Science
International Relations Sciences
Mathematics and Numbers Social Sciences

Business

Engineering

International Relations

Mathematics and Numbers

Number Display

Writing About Numbers

Policy Analysis

Political Science

Sciences

Social Sciences

Additional short videos and handouts are included in "Resources by Topic."

Reading

What to Avoid

Writing Tips

Academic Writing Naval Postgraduate School
Intelligence Community Terms and Abbreviations
Military Resources  

Academic Writing

Intelligence Community

Military Resources

Naval Postgraduate School

Terms and Abbreviations

Follow this link for guidelines and templates for creating a poster. Contact the Writing Center for assistance.

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Book List

Click here for a pdf listing the writing books in the DKL-GWC collection.