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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya

Navy Energy Czar ASN McGinn Tours Campus, Talks Energy
By Kenneth A. Stewart

Assistant Secretary of the Navy – Energy, Installations & Environment retired Vice Adm. Dennis McGinn, left, meets with NPS students during a campus visit, Oct. 29. McGinn traveled to NPS to see first hand the work that students and faculty are doing to meet Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus' call for "game-changing approaches to energy" that will transform the service's dependence on fossil fuels.

"We have three ways to think about achieving our energy goal," explained McGinn. "One of course is technology, we like to talk about biofuels, microgrids, solar wind, energy biomass, etc. Those things are important, but they are really insufficient to getting us to where we need go to achieve better warfighting effectiveness."

"We [also] need to have partnerships - partnerships across government, across state, and partnerships with the private sector to make sure that we are aware of the best practices and the best technologies … that can help us to achieve our goals," he continued. "And the last component is cultural change. We have to increase our level of knowledge and our level of commitment through that knowledge to the central role of energy in the Navy."

Visiting Professor of Operations Research Dr. Dan Nussbaum has been at the forefront of NPS' energy programs as Chair of the university's Energy Academic Group. He described efforts to inspire the adoption of energy innovations and ongoing NPS initiatives aimed at educating senior leaders.

"The Cebrowski Institute and the Operations Research Department have been working together on a number of initiatives. We put together a course for flag officers and senior DON civilians called "Leading Innovation with an Energy Application Focus" … that class is now mandatory for Navy flag officers and senior civilians," said Nussbaum.

Nussbaum points to other NPS programs have championed advances in materials and battery technology as well as optimization tools like the Replenishment at Sea Planner (RASP), and recent efforts to conduct cost benefit analyses in areas such as lighting that have saved the Navy millions in energy and replacement costs.



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Courtesy photo by Lt. Matthew Mitchelson
Student-Run Club Gives Back to Wounded Warrior
By MC2 Danica M. Sirmans

Wounded Warrior Marine Corps Sgt. Christopher Hankins, left, is pictured with a fellow guest at a hunting retreat in northern Ohio, Oct. 10. Nominated by members of Wounded Warrior Battalion - West, Hankins was awarded a free trip through the Lazy Lab Hunting Club Wounded Warrior Hunt, an effort led by NPS student Lt. Matthew Mitchelson, with the assistance of fellow student Lt. Robert Kelly, to give back to wounded veterans and their families.

"I began this club and outreach as a way to give back to Disabled Veterans, Wounded Warriors, active duty personnel, and their families," said Mitchelson.

"I'm very proud of our members and volunteers who stepped up to help," added Lazy Lab Hunting Club Vice President David J. Desrosiers III. "This experience proves that American citizens truly care about their injured warriors and desire to give back for the many sacrifices that servicemen and women endure."

Hankins was nominated for the trip through Camp Pendleton's Wounded Warrior Battalion – West. The event provided a special excursion for members of the battalion, and raised awareness of the club's mission to support military members and their families. Mitchelson created the Lazy Lab Hunting Club in 2008.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Michael Ehrich
Naval War College Monterey Graduates Honored for Academic Achievement
By MC3 Michael Ehrlich

A select group of the 19 NPS students earning academic honors from the Naval War College (NWC) Monterey program for the fourth quarter of Academic Year 2014 are pictured during a brief ceremony in their honor near the NWC program offices in Halligan Hall, Oct. 28.

Pictured from left to right, first row, are Navy Lt. Thomas Newman, Marine Corps Capt. Robin Fonseca, Marine Corps Maj. Michael Clark, and Navy Lt. Michael Deloach. Pictured, back row, are Army Maj. Anthony Heisler, Army Maj. Ryan Schloesser, Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Peter Morisseau, Army Maj. Michael Hutchinson, Army Maj. Alan Enke, Army Maj. Kitefre Oboho and Army Maj. Joshua Mangas.

"The curriculum was challenging and broadened my understanding of critical concepts at the operational and strategic levels of war," said Newman. "I feel much better prepared to serve in a joint environment and add value as a staff officer in future assignments."

Graduates earning "with Highest Distinction" honors by completing the program in the top five percent of their class include Deloach, as well as Marine Corps Capt. Austin Duncan, Marine Corps Capt. Robert Epstein, Navy Lt. Kevin Kerno and Marine Corps Capt. Johnathon Rice, not pictured.

Graduates earning "with Distinction" honors by competing the program in the top 15 percent of their class include Clark, Enke, Fonseca, Hutchinson, Heisler, Mangas, Morisseau, Newman, Oboho, Schloesser as well as Navy Lt. Samuel Chung, Army Maj. Marco Lyons, Marine Corps Capt. Ross Norman and Army Maj. Seth Womack, not pictured.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Michael Ehrlich
Latest Menneken Lecture Details the Future of Shipbuilding
By MC3 Michael Ehrlich

Senior Defense Advisor with the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA), retired Rear Adm. Joe Carnevale, delivers a lecture to NPS' undersea warfare community in Spanagel Hall, Oct. 23. With over 40 years of related military and government service, Carnevale is considered one of the nation's leading experts on the shipbuilding industry.

"The number one problem in the shipyard industry is a lack of skilled labor… partly due to gaps between construction projects," said Carnevale. "The companies that are not working in more than one capacity have people being laid-off and later rehired and retrained."

According to Carnevale, better planning would help to avoid construction gaps and keep workers employed, which would in turn help to keep the industry afloat with more positive fiscal results.

Carnevale offered three steps toward building more affordable ships including the detailing of design requirements prior to construction, design completion prior to building, and competitive solicitation.

"There are lots of good ideas on how to reduce costs, but all of them are on the fringe if you don't do these three things," said Carnevale.

The Menneken Lecture Series allows NPS undersea warfare students to engage and interact with experts and policy makers in relevant fields of study, and serves as an opportunity for professional academic development for university students and faculty.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence
NSAM Honored With Gold Level in SECNAV Energy and Water Management Awards
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

Incoming Naval Support Activity Monterey (NSAM) Resource Efficiency Manager Douglass Taber, right, and his outgoing counterpart Ken Jenvey, left, are pictured in front of their electric vehicles, Oct. 27. Jenvey and his team were recently honored with Gold Level recognition in the Secretary of the Navy's 2014 Energy and Water Management Awards.

Taber is a familiar face around NSA Monterey, working on base for several years before transferring to Naval Air Station Lemoore. He recently returned to NSAM, and was pleased to see conservation has remained a top priority to base leadership.

"It's a culture," said Taber. "There is no single action you can do to make the change, you have to work at it a little at a time."

The SECNAV Energy and Water Management Awards honor four tiers of awardees: flag, platinum, gold and blue levels. NSA Monterey's "Gold Level" of achievement indicates a very good to outstanding energy program based on comprehensive efficiency programs with senior-level command involvement, well-staffed and trained energy teams, aggressive awareness campaigns, innovative energy efficiency measures, and a consistent reduction in energy consumption.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Michael Ehrlich
NPS Leadership, Local 1690 Establish Labor Management Forum Charter
By Kenneth A. Stewart

NPS President retired Vice Adm. Ronald A. Route, left, shakes hands with National Federation of Federal Employees Local 1690 President Pete Randazzo, right, after signing a Labor Management Forum Charter, Oct. 16. Local 1690 and NPS Human Resources Department leadership, background above, were on hand to witness the signing, which formalized management-union relations at NPS.

"This is an excellent agreement and an excellent start," said Route. "We hope that you feel that you can trust us. We are here because we all feel that we can trust you."

"The signing of our Labor Management Forum charter is yet another step in NPS' goal of documenting and formalizing practices that have been actively in place, but without standardization," said Randazzo.

"NFFE Local 1690 has always been proud of the working partnerships and relationships between management and labor that have been behind many of our successes and accomplishments. Of course, this is made easy by the tremendous staff that we are so proud to represent," he continued.


The agreement formalizes processes that are intended to foster cooperative and productive labor-management relations by providing a venue for open discussion between union officials and NPS management.

According to the agreement, forum participants will address policy-level issues affecting the civilian workforce by discussing solutions to workplace issues, following through on commitments, and working toward mutually-established goals in a cooperative manner.

"We are confident this forum will enhance the current labor-management partnership and demonstrate our commitment to discussing and resolving issues impacting our valued NPS employees," said Route.



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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Shawn J. Stewart
Marine Corps Student to Compete in Armed Forces Marathon Championship
By MC2 Shawn J. Stewart

Marine Corps Capt. Christine Taranto, a logistics management student in NPS' Graduate School of Business and Public Policy, is pictured outside of Herrmann Hall, Oct. 18. Taranto is a member of the service-wide All-Marine Running Team and will be competing in the 39th Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Oct. 26.

She will be among top-tier runners from all branches of the U.S. and allied militaries. The runners will traverse 26.2 miles of Virginia and D.C. coastline on a set route beginning at Arlington National Cemetery and culminating at the U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial.

"This will be my fourth marathon and I'm excited because it's also a part of the Armed Forces Marathon Championship (AFMC)," said Taranto. "All of the armed service's teams will be there … roughly 30,000 of our best friends competing for individual and team places."

With exception to the mixed category, marathon teams are made-up of three to five runners who are scored based on their top three finishers' race times.

"The level of competition at this event is very high," Taranto said. "Last year, I was the first female active-duty Marine finisher at MCM but only 7th overall in the AFMC … That experience gave me the motivation I need to train harder, move forward and hopefully place individually."


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence
NIPO Director Recognizes IGPO During Campus Visit
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

NPS alumnus, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for International Programs (NIPO) Rear Adm. James J. Shannon, right, recognizes the accomplishments of Assistant Dean of the School of International Graduate Studies and Director of the International Graduate Programs Office (IGPO), retired U.S. Marine Corps Col. Gary Roser, left, during Shannon's first official visit to NPS, Oct. 9, since his graduation in communications systems management.

In addition to observing IGPO operations and examining curricula, and a presentation to all international students, Shannon presented Roser with a gift in recognition of his more than 50 years of service as both an active duty military officer and a federal employee.

"We are extremely proud to present you with this gift," said Shannon. "This is a small token for the hard work you have provided throughout the years."

Roser was honored to receive the award, but deflected his accomplishments by recognizing the students, faculty and staff hat have made NPS and its international programs a success.

"We look at ourselves as a world-class institution," said Roser. "To be world-class, you have to have world-class faculty with world-class researchers, and the third component, is the need for world-class students."

In his role as the Navy's Director of International Programs, Shannon manages and implements international security assistance programs, cooperative development programs, and technology security policy. The NIPO office supports regional Combatant Commanders and Navy leadership in their efforts to build relationships with U.S. maritime security partners around the world.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Michael Ehrich
Students, Faculty Hope to Extend Kepler Spacecraft's Operational Utility
By MC3 Michael Ehrlich

NPS students Lt. Eric Kinzbrunner, left, and Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Argenziano, middle, are pictured in the Space Systems Lab in Bullard Hall. With the assistance of their advisor, Research Assistant Professor Mark Karpenko, right, the two students' research may just have an impact on NASA's deep space observation satellite, the Kepler Spacecraft.

The Kepler is a "planet-hunting telescope," said Karpenko, launched in March of 2009 to hunt space for earth-like planets rotating other stars. During Kepler's original mission it was able to confirm 978 planets in the Cygnus constellation. But over this lengthy time in space, two of Kepler's four reaction wheels that create the stability necessary to point accurately have surpassed their life span. The spacecraft is still operational, but with two less reaction wheels, researchers now have several interesting questions, some of which Kinzbrunner and Argenziano may help answer.

"The main objective of my thesis is to determine the pointing accuracy achievable at various possible science attitudes with the remaining two reaction wheels," said Kinzbrunner. "In order to support this objective, different models of the Kepler solar torque disturbance will be compared to each other and [with] empirical data."

"Before the reaction wheel failures, Kepler had already completed its original mission," added Karpenko. "But, since Kepler still has two functioning wheels we can ask questions like, what can we do now with this spacecraft and its remaining fuel and capabilities? How can we minimize the amount of fuel we are going to use in order to prolong and extend its life expectancy? Or, is it possible to conduct science operations without using any fuel at all?"

For more information on the students' research, and on similar campus efforts into optimal control algorithms, check out the full story on the NPS.edu.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Danica M. Sirmans

Monterey Community Celebrates Navy's 239th Birthday
By MC2 Danica M. Sirmans

The NPS Honor Guard parades the colors at the commencement of the Monterey Peninsula Navy Ball held in the Barbara McNitt Ballroom, Oct. 18. Monterey County Deputy District Attorney James "Jimmy" Panetta served as guest speaker at the event.

"As a veteran, I am humbled to be here with all of you," said Panetta. "Your service to your country and to this community is appreciated. This is a community that we all call home, but it is one that I will always call home, and I thank you for all that you do here at NPS."

Panetta graduated from Carmel High School and served as an Intelligence Officer in the U.S. Navy where he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Meritorious Service in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

In 1972, then Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt authorized recognition of October 13 as the Navy's birthday. Since, each CNO has encouraged a Navy-wide celebration of the occasion to enhance a greater appreciation of our Navy heritage, and to provide a positive influence toward pride and professionalism in the naval service.



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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Michael Ehrlich
NPS, Public Works Partner to Enhance Laboratory Safety
By MC3 Michael Ehrlich

Maintenance Mechanic Tony Mosely is pictured next to a newly-installed emergency eyewash station in Halligan Hall, Oct. 14. Mosely will be installing more than a dozen of these stations throughout several NPS labs in a joint effort with Public Works to enhance the safety of NPS students, faculty and staff.

"These stations will be more accessible, if they are ever needed," said Chris Williams, Public Works Lead on the project. "We want to make sure that anyone working in these labs has access to the proper safety equipment."

The installation of the new eyewash stations brings NPS into greater Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance. For information on chemical hazards and how to respond to chemical accidents, reference the Material Safety Data Sheet located in the appropriate laboratories and workspaces across campus.


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Former NPS Superintendent Marsha Evans Returns to Campus
By Javier Chagoya

Former NPS Superintendent retired Rear Adm. Marsha J. Evans stands in front of the superintendent portrait gallery in Herrmann Hall, Oct. 9. In Monterey on a personal trip, Evans paid her first visit to the university campus since she served as the institution's first female Superintendent from 1995-1998.

"We could tell some stories about the place," she laughed with Executive Assistant Virginia Caldwell, who also served as Evans' assistant during her term.

Evans spent a short time with current university President retired Vice Adm. Ronald A. Route in his office, which gave the two a chance to catch up. Evans and Route knew each other when they were both active duty captains serving in the Pentagon. While Superintendent at NPS, Evans also served as the interim director of the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch, Germany.

"Those were long commutes," she recalled. "But then we did something that had not been possible before on campus … We began using one of the first public videoconference systems to communicate between the Marshall Center and NPS. That saved me from the back and forth trips to Garmisch."

Evans ascended through the officer ranks when women were rare in the flag officer community. Evans became the first woman to command a Naval Base in 1990, and served as Executive Director of the Standing Committee on Military and Civilian Women in the Navy, responsible for developing a strategy to address gender issues in the service following the Tailhook incident. Evans' post-military career included terms as Executive Director of the Girl Scouts of America, as well as Chief Executive Officer of the American Red Cross.


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Students Test Research Techniques in Tidal Zone Classroom
By Javier Chagoya

Oceanography students watch for a signal from shore to turn on a water pump that will feed a submerged, self-logging sensor designed to record tidal zone temperatures at Del Monte Beach, Oct. 6. NPS Department of Oceanography Associate Professor Jamie MacMahan guided the students through the process of gathering tidal zone data.

"The purpose of the sensors is to measure the thermal heating and cooling of the sand over the vertical as a function of tidal level and solar radiation," explained MacMahon.

The wetsuit-clad students fought cold water temperatures while deploying seven temperature stations in an effort to gain experience in oceanographic field data collection.

"We learned a lot about the difficulties and complexities of deploying instruments in the field, especially in the dynamic environment of the surf zone," said Lt. Charlotte Benbow. "I also found that when you are conducting an experiment, you have to be prepared to modify your plan if the conditions dictate."

Oceanography students and staff pictured above from left are Lt. Mike Papa, Korean Navy Lt. Cmdr. Hyewon Choi, Lt. Dustin Hocking, Lt. Cmdr. Darin Keeter, Lt. Charlotte Benbow, Lt. Cmdr. Mathias Roth and NPS Physical Science Technician Keith Wyckoff.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Shawn J. Stewart
NPS, NSAM Communities Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month
By MC2 Danica Sirmans

Traditional Aztec dance group Yaocuauhtli Danza Cultural performs during NPS' National Hispanic Heritage Month celebration at the Roman Plunge Reflecting Pool, Oct. 8. Each year, National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed and celebrated by NPS, the U.S. Navy, and the nation from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15.

"We're excited to have been invited to your beautiful campus today," said Carol Ruvalcaba, a member of the group. "We're dedicated to promoting healthy living to our dancers and participants. We focus on strengthening the identity of the Mexican community through teachings of the indigenous traditions of their ancestors."

Along with the performance, NPS' Multicultural Heritage Committee gave a presentation highlighting influential Hispanic and Latino leaders – civilian and military alike.

"Since we are at the Naval Postgraduate School, it's appropriate to mention one of the most influential Hispanic leaders in the sciences," said Multicultural Heritage Committee Coordinator Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danica Sirmans. "Dr. France A. Córdova is the youngest person to ever be named the chief scientist at NASA. She is the first Latina to be sworn in as director of the National Science Foundation."

NPS' Multicultural Heritage Committee is dedicated to recognizing the university's diverse student body, workforce, faculty, staff and their profound influence on our local community, country and allied nations through their strong commitment to family, faith, hard work, and public service.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

TRADOC Analysis Leads to Prestigious Payne Award for NPS Ops Research
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

NPS Department of Operations Research Assistant Professor Emily Craparo is pictured with the 2013 Dr. Wilbur B. Payne Memorial Award for Excellence in Analysis (Large Group Category). The award recognizes the best large and small group operations research analyses conducted in the previous year by Army analysis organizations.

"We received the Wilbur Payne Award in recognition of our efforts in support of a study performed by the Army's Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Analysis Center," said Craparo.

"My role in the project was in developing the Joint Platform Allocation Tool (JPAT)," she continued. "JPAT is an optimization model designed to determine the asset procurement schedule that allows the Army to best fulfill their projected mission requirements while staying within their budget."

JPAT evaluates inputs such as mission requirements, locations of available equipment, and budgetary constraints to determine an effective assignment of unmanned aerial reconnaissance and surveillance assets to missions.

"It's really gratifying to receive this award in recognition of our efforts," said Craparo. "But the best outcome of the study is that now the Army has a tool available to help them make important decisions about their aerial reconnaissance and surveillance asset portfolio."



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U.S. Navy Photo by MC3 Michael Ehrlich
NPS Ops Research Professor Receives Superior Service Medal
By MC3 Michael Ehrlich

Operations Research Professor of Practice retired Navy Capt. Jeff Kline, right, receives the Navy's Superior Civilian Service Award for his distinguished contributions as Director for the Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER) from university President retired Vice Adm. Ronald A. Route, left, in Glasgow Hall, Oct. 10.

The award was presented for Klein's innovative and visionary leadership, strategic planning initiatives, and effective execution as CRUSER director from February 2011 to September 2013.

"In 2001, when I transitioned out of the Navy, I was blessed with a lot of opportunities," said Kline. "The reason I stayed at the Naval Postgraduate School was to continue to work with junior officers and to work with the finest group of professional faculty I have ever had the experience of working with."

As the founding CRUSER director, Klein was the driving force behind the Secretary of Navy's initiative to shape generations of naval officers through education, research, concept generation and experimentation into robotics and unmanned systems, and provided a DOD wide community of interest to exchange research and experimentation results.

"What this award really affords is recognition of a catalyst," said Kline, "getting people together with a common vision. I'm honored to be here and to continue my career here with all of you, while continuing to shape the Department of Defense and the defense of our nation."


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Patent Office Works to Safeguard Intellectual Property
By Kenneth A. Stewart

Associate Counsel, Intellectual Property Attorney Lisa Norris, left, and her assistant, Paralegal Kate Black-Will, right, are pictured in their NPS office with some of the patents that they have worked tirelessly to defend and produce. Their work ensures that NPS students and faculty receive proper recognition and that their intellectual property is protected long after they have moved on.

Norris came to NPS six yeas ago after practicing patent law at a local law office in Monterey. But prior to beginning her legal career, she served in the Air Force as an electronic-communications officer where she was given the opportunity to study at NPS earning a Master of Science in Systems Technology.

"I love this school, it is really great to be back here at NPS," said Norris. "When I came on board, there were six active patents, now there are 39 … All of them are very interesting in their own way. I have filed for everything from satellite release, electronic circuit, and plasma propulsion systems."

Black-Will was brought on recently to assist Norris. As a paralegal, she is trained to spot legal and factual issues and to properly file actions with the courts and agencies that support the patent process.

"My job as a paralegal is to make the attorneys' lives easier, allowing them to do more legal work as I take on some of the administrative burdens," said Black-Will.

For more information about the patent team's efforts, check out the full story on the NPS.edu.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis Torrence
Energy Academic Group Kicks Off Series of Nuclear-Focused Seminars
By Kenneth A. Stewart

Dr. J. Steven Herring, a retired Laboratory Fellow with the Idaho National Laboratory, presents the first in a series of six biweekly Energy Academic Group sponsored seminars devoted to the subject of nuclear power in the Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Auditorium, Oct. 3.

Herring opened a window into the history of nuclear power development domestically and abroad. He walked students and faculty through the current state of nuclear power production and offered his views regarding potential nuclear power use in the future. During his presentation, Herring pointed to the seven million tons of proven uranium reserves and the 10 million tons of speculative reserves that he believes represent a reliable source of clean energy for the future.

"Uranium resources and production are on the rise with the security of the uranium supply ensured for the long term," said Herring.

Herring also discussed increased safety measures and the generally positive nuclear power track record, as well as lessons-learned from the failed Fukushima Nuclear Plant and other nuclear plant disasters including those at Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl.

Herring recently retired from a chairman position at the Idaho National Laboratory and as Deputy Director for Nuclear Systems Analysis and Design. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society, and in 2004 received its Mishima Award for contributions to the development of thorium-uranium fuels.

For more information on the Energy Academic Group Defense Energy Seminar Series, visit their website.


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U.S. Navy Photo by MC2 Danica M. Sirmans
Student-Initiated Warrior Day to be Held Quarterly
By Dale M. Kuska

University students traversing the lengthy Root Hall corridor participate in NPS' Warrior Day, Sept. 30, sporting their respective operational working uniforms as opposed to the traditional Service Khakis on the first Tuesday of the new Fall Quarter.

"Warrior day is a student initiative with the goals of, one, highlighting the varied warfare communities of our military student, faculty and staff populations, and two, reminding all of why we are here and what lies ahead for many students when they leave," said NPS Dean of Students Capt. Matt Vandersluis.

Civilian business casual is the standard attire for students and faculty at the university, with all military students required to wear their Service Uniform each Tuesday, and on designated special occasions. Warrior Day takes the place on the first uniform day of each quarter, and has thus far been well received.

"As I drove into work on Warrior Day, it was readily apparent that the student body had embraced the concept," noted Vandersluis. "It was both inspirational and motivating to me to see the student body wearing their true 'business casual' as they headed off to class to hone their greatest weapons … their minds."


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Navy's Senior Financial Management Leadership Tour Campus
By Dale M. Kuska

Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Financial Management and Comptroller, the Honorable Susan J. Rabern, second from right, and Scott Lutterloh, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education, far right, attend a brief on the NPS Department of Defense Analysis during a visit to the institution, Oct. 1. Rabern spent two days on campus for a series of briefings and meetings on the university's unique graduate education and research programs.

Both Rabern and Lutterloh are key figures in the Navy's efforts to manage personnel and manpower controls established through a Congressional requirement. While Lutterloh has been to NPS a number of times over the past few years, this visit marks Rabern's first, providing her with a first-hand view at several of the institution's programs.

"We appreciate the time Secretary Rabern dedicated to visiting our institution, and to learning more about our programs and efforts," said NPS President retired Vice Adm. Ronald A. Route, pictured left. "She was engaged during our meetings, asked thought-provoking questions, and enjoyed interacting with many of our students, faculty and staff."

Rabern's visit to the campus included several briefs with senior leadership across the Quad related to the Navy's end strength requirements, as well as lab tours and meetings with students. She also met with local Congressman, the Honorable Sam Farr, U.S. Representative for California's 20th District.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence
Afternoon Fun Run Kicks Off the Fall Season
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

Naval Support Activity (NSA) Monterey Commanding Officer Capt. Timothy Faller, above right, signals the start of the 2014 Fall Fun Run 5K in front of Herrmann Hall, Sept. 25. The National Federation of Federal Employees Local 1690, NSA Monterey's Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office, the Navy Federal Credit Union and the Navy Exchange sponsored the event.

"This run was an event to kick off the fall season," said MWR Community Activities Coordinator Lindsay Carver. Beginning January 2015, Carver added, MWR will begin holding a monthly run for members of the NPS, NSA Monterey communities.

"The run series will be a new program for NSA Monterey," she said. "We hope that it will be a great new expansion to our existing programs."


Next up for MWR is the annual Terror in the Trident Halloween party slated for Oct. 30, as well as the Turkey Trot 5K on Nov. 21. For more information on these and other weekly MWR events and opportunities, visit http://navylifesw.com/monterey/.



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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Class Shawn J. Stewart
MOVES Program Manger Honored for Excellence
By MC2 Shawn J. Stewart

Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES) Institute Program Manager Wendy Walsh is pictured holding the 2014 Cybersecurity Symposium Award of Excellence at the Roman Plunge Reflecting Pool, Oct. 1. Walsh received the award for her role in helping to build California's state Cybersecurity Task Force, and was presented the trophy by the California Department of Technology's Information Security Office.

"For about a year and a half I've been working with the California state Cybersecurity Task Force," said Walsh. "The task force is made up of the California Technology Agency and the California Office of Emergency Services who came together and asked the question, 'How can we strategize for cybersecurity issues throughout our state?'"

Walsh detailed several points of the task force agenda, to include things like Red versus Blue training demonstrations at the grade school level, cyber education, building industry, as well as factors affecting the public.

"We really want the general public to know about these threats," said Walsh. "Grandma now has an iPad … she's never had an e-mail account, she's never used a computer but now she has an IPad and she needs to know how to use it.

"How can we make sure that she doesn't do some online banking and get exploited?" she added. "These are the important issues we have to tackle."


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Today@NPS showcases some of the speakers, conferences, experiments, lectures, and other events that take place at the Naval Postgraduate School on a daily basis. If you would like more information about any of the highlighted activities please contact the public affairs office at pao@nps.edu.

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