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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

DRMI Faculty and Staff Honored at Awards Ceremony
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

Defense Resources Management Institute (DRMI) Executive Director Dr. Natalie Webb, left, and Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) Dean Dr. William Gates, right, present Assistant Professor Jay Simon, center, with the 2013 DRMI Faculty Award, Jan. 31.

Simon was recognized for excellence in classroom instruction and for his ongoing efforts to develop curricula in the area of operations research.

Also recognized at the ceremony was DRMI’s Scott Ramos. Ramos was honored with the 2013 DRMI Staff Member of the Year award.

“I am thankful and appreciative of everyone who helped me along the way,” said Ramos whose outstanding administrative work and logistical support caught the attention of DRMI leadership and fellow faculty members.



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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Education, Collaboration Key to Monterey County Disaster Preparedness
By Javier Chagoya

NPS Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) Coordinator Wendy Walsh, left, and CHDS Strategic Communications Director Heather Issvoran, right, listen to a panel of infrastructure experts during the Disaster Resiliency Summit held at California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), Jan. 29.

Walsh and Issvoran were also panelists at the summit. They discussed NPS contributions to the recently formed Monterey Peninsula Regional Emergency Operations Center (MPREOC), a cooperative effort between NPS, CSUMB, the cities of Seaside and Marina, CalFire and the Monterey County Office of Emergency Services.

“Our panel discussion focused on how our local first responders and public safety officials should take advantage of the tremendous educational resources NPS’ Center for Homeland Defense and Security have to offer, said Issvoran.

Walsh has been coordinating disaster preparedness initiatives with the community and with local leadership for nearly a decade. She was pleased by what she saw at the summit.

“I have been so fortunate to work with some of our communities most passionate and inspirational community leaders over the past nine years and look forward to additional opportunities for NPS to collaborate with our local community as it becomes more resilient," said Walsh.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Shawn J. Stewart
GSBPP Professor to Serve as Editor for New Public Affairs Journal
By MC2 Shawn J. Stewart

NPS Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) Associate Professor Dr. Robert Eger III, pictured in front of the university’s Roman Plunge Reflecting Pool, has been selected to serve as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Public and Nonprofit Affairs (JPNA), the only open access journal in the public affairs discipline.

“My new position provides NPS the opportunity to engage with both academics and practitioners in public affairs,” said Eger. “Given that I am a professor in the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy, this position highlights the importance of public policy within the mission of GSBPP at NPS.”

JPNA is associated with the Midwest Public Affairs Conference, an educational consortium that promotes research, collaboration and socialization between academics, graduate students, policymakers and practitioners in the discipline of public affairs.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Danica M. Sirman
Workshop Helps NPS Students, Staff Prepare for Tax Season
By MC3 Danica M. Sirmans

Retired Navy Capt. Dean Taylor with the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program discusses tax preparation at the La Mesa Village Retired Activities Office, Feb. 7. VITA provides tips and teaches courses on how to better prepare and correctly file state and federal tax returns.

Retired Navy Captain Laurel Costen works with Taylor as a second volunteer in the preparation center, and will soon take over operations of the program.

“Yearly, so many of our service members have their taxes filed poorly,” said Costen. “It’s important that their taxes are filed correctly to ensure that people aren’t missing out on money that they’re entitled to, or in some cases, overlooking money that they may be responsible to pay.”

VITA organizers welcome service members and their dependents to participate and ask questions about their taxes. They specialize in both California and Federal tax returns and can offer advice on amending returns that have already been filed.


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
NYPD Assistant Police Chief Among CHDS Program Graduates
By Javier Chagoya

Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) Executive Leaders Program (ELP) graduates stand for a class portrait outside Herrmann Hall, Feb. 7. The graduates represent a wide swathe of security professionals ranging from emergency management personnel to recently-appointed New York Police Department (NYPD) Assistant Chief, Brian McCarthy.

“I read about the CHDS program on our headquarters bulletin board and from talking to others who had taken the ELP course,” said McCarthy. “I really wanted to come to the center at NPS to be in an environment of higher education whose sole focus is on homeland security and to fulfill a personal need for learning.”

McCarthy is a Brooklyn native and a 31-year veteran of the New York City Police Department (NYPD) who actually learned of his promotion to Assistant Chief while completing his fourth week at CHDS. When he returns to New York, he will be in charge of some 20,000 patrol officers.

“I’m taking away multiple ideas with an emphasis on building relationships in the private sector, public service partnerships, and improving community relations,” said McCarthy.


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U.S. Navy Photo by Kenneth A. Stewart
NPS Faculty Come Together to Examine the Possibilities of “Big Data”
By Kenneth A. Stewart

NPS Department of Computer Science Chair and Cebrowski Institute Director Dr. Peter Denning welcomes a cohort of 30-plus university faculty, along with remote experts and Office of Naval Research officials tuning in from Washington, D.C. and Rhode Island, to the Big Data Symposium, Feb. 11. The symposium brought together an interdisciplinary team of academics and student researchers to think about data analytics.

“Our real purpose here is to bring people together and to stir up a lot of ideas, to see what people are thinking about and how they understand ‘big data,’” said Denning.

A key feature of the symposium was a presentation offered by Office of Naval Research Director of Experimentation Wayne Parris titled, “Data Science: An Elemental and Critical Component for Achieving Naval Information Dominance.”

Parris and symposium attendees discussed current trends in what is commonly referred to as ‘big data,’ or massive amounts of data so large that traditional processing methods become obsolete. The group focused their preliminary discussions on means by which experts could extract value and information from big data that can be visualized and communicated to Navy decision makers in a timely manner.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence
NSAM Initiates Master Plan to Forecast Future Installation Needs
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest Community Planner Garth Nagel addresses a diverse group of campus representatives during the Naval Support Activity Monterey (NSAM) Master Plan Kick-Off, Feb. 11. The meeting signaled the beginning of an installation-wide effort to forecast future needs in infrastructure and facilities across NPS and all NSAM tenants.

“Typically we do this every 10 years,” said Nagel, adding that, when complete, the final installation master plan strategy will look at short, intermediate and long-term installation needs.

NSAM Commanding Officer Capt. Gerral David stressed the importance of the region-wide master plan initiative, noting it will be an integral component to future funding requests.

“My challenge to you is to look to the future,” said David. “Let’s look at our mission, our requirements and needs, and at things we can reconfigure. Ultimately, this is your plan, and we want to enable you to perform your mission as best as possible.”


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Shawn Stewart
Vice Chief of Naval Operations Holds Campus Q&A
By MC2 Chablis Torrence

Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson addresses students, faculty and staff in the university’s King Auditorium, Feb. 12. An NPS alumnus, Ferguson shared personal experiences from his time as a student, and offered advice on career progression and the importance of their studies.

"The education and perspective you gain during your time here is invaluable," Ferguson said. "Take full advantage of the opportunity you have at NPS to think about the strategic challenges and choices you'll face in the future."

As the Navy and DOD continue the strategic pivot to the Pacific, Ferguson told the packed audience that political instability around the globe, and in regions beyond Asia like the Eastern Mediterranean, Africa and others, will keep the warfighting capabilities of the Navy at a premium.

"The demand for naval forces has never been higher," Ferguson said. "As we transition out of two prolonged land wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, we are seeing increased demand from the combatant commanders for naval forces."

Retired Vice Adm. Ronald A. Route, NPS President, thanked Ferguson for his time and for his continued support of the institution.

"Adm. Mark Ferguson is a distinguished alumnus of the Naval Postgraduate School, and has been a consistent, vocal advocate of the institution and the value of our efforts to educate our students, our military’s leaders,” he said. “VCNO Ferguson dedicated a significant portion of his time here on campus to share his perspective, offer advice and to field questions directly from our community of students, faculty and staff. We thank him for including us on his trip to the West Coast."

Ferguson is the second highest-ranking officer in the Department of the Navy and is the 37th naval officer to serve as VCNO, a position that he has held since 2011. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978 and has served with distinction for the last 35 years.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence
NSAM Exercise Gauges Emergency Response Capabilities
By Kenneth A. Stewart

Naval Support Activity Monterey (NSAM), City of Monterey and Presidio of Monterey Army Garrison security forces came together for an emergency response exercise at the La Mesa Village housing complex, Feb. 13.

The exercise simulated the combined response of emergency services and security personnel to an active shooter within the housing area.

“It was a great exercise; we had excellent coordination between all of the participants and we took away many lessons-learned,” said NSAM Emergency Management Officer Dave Yeager.

The exercise was conducted in preparation for a larger exercise, dubbed Citadel Shied that will take place, Feb. 25.

“The purpose of these exercises is to test our anti-terrorism force protection team and our ability to conduct emergency response operations,” said Yeager. “NSAM will be also be testing the ‘giant voice’ and other emergency notification capabilities.”


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Danica M. Sirmans
NPS President Holds Campus Communication with DKL Staff
By MC3 Danica M. Sirmans

Naval Postgraduate School President, retired Vice Adm. Ronald Route, meets with Dudley Knox Library staff and leadership following an in depth tour of NPS’ award-winning library, Feb. 13. The meeting is one of a series of campus communication gatherings to familiarize the NPS faculty and staff with their leadership and vice versa.

University Librarian, Eleanor Uhlinger, introduced the president after giving a thorough tour of the library and its resources. Route gave his remarks on the library and the services it provides.

“We have the world's best students, coming from operational assignments in the fleet and on the battlefield,” Route said. “And they select topics of research that are directly relevant back to the fleet and battlefield. During my time here, I have clearly seen how all of you provide access to invaluable resources that enable our students to succeed.”

Route will continue his campus communication series to help facilitate open communication throughout the institution.


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Collaborative Experimentation Program Saves Stranded Motorist Thousands of Miles Away
By Javier Chagoya

Dr. Kevin Montgomery, Technical Director of the National Biocomputation Center at Stanford University, runs live tweets emanating from Atlanta, Ga., during the city's crippling winter storm on the morning of Feb. 12. Montgomery was one of hundreds of participants in action at Camp Roberts, Calif., for NPS’ Joint Interagency Field Experimentation Program (JIFX), a collaborative effort to remove barriers between defense-driven problems and their corresponding solutions led by faculty and researchers in the university’s Department of Information Sciences.

Montgomery, along with researchers from NPS, Carnegie Mellon and other institutions, were examining disaster relief applications of social media, and seized the opportunity of the catastrophic event in Atlanta to assist a stranded commuter, one of many reaching out via common social media outlets.

"We can share scarce resources as never before and we can collaborate with the world around us – that connection to network and leverage communication tools will bring us even closer together," said Montgomery.

The researchers at JIFX leveraged various tools, including cutting-edge analytical programs that help integrate the flow of large-scale data to create high-resolution depictions of a region as well as human interactions. Montgomery is a leader in computation, visualization and simulation and shared with researchers at JIFX his geospatial social platform, Collaborate.org. It was one of the many tools that helped locate and then send help to the stranded motorist' location.

Held quarterly, JIFX bright together dozens of technologists in the field of communications, command and control, alternative energy, integrated collaborative tools used in social media and unmanned Aerial vehicles.


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U.S. Navy Photo by MCSN Michael Ehrlich
Cyber Students, Industry Execs Contemplate ‘Big Data’
By MCSN Michael Ehrlich

Microsoft Institute for Advanced Technology in Government Senior Director David Aucsmith speaks to NPS students, faculty and staff about the company’s efforts to fight global cybercrime and botnets using ‘big data’ during a guest lecture in NPS’ Glasgow Hall, Feb. 19. Aucsmith, an NPS alumnus and cybersecurity expert, is a leading proponent of cyber defense initiatives.

“Microsoft has made a significant investment into helping fight cybercrime,” said Aucsmith. “We are trying to take-out global cybercrime in partnership with industry and government.

“Most cyber problems can only be successfully confronted in partnership between governments and private entities … We have opened up a large center whose sole job is to cooperate, host and help government entities like the FBI, secret service and foreign governments,” he continued.

“[Aucsmith] has been a frequent speaker for senior information dominance short courses,” said Navy Capt. Tim Unrein. “He’s also been willing to talk to our cyber students and faculty and give his perspectives on cyber warfare, cyber criminal activity, and the general infrastructure of the cyber domain.”


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U.S. Navy Photo by Javier Chagoya
Southcom Commander Addresses Naval Postgraduate School Students
By Kenneth A. Stewart

Marine Corps Gen. John F. Kelly, head of the United States Southern Command (Southcom), answers a student question during his visit to NPS, Feb. 19. Kelly spoke to a packed house of NPS students, faculty and staff during a wide-ranging discussion about his area of operations, the war on drugs, and the future of Latin America.

Kelly is no stranger to the Navy’s graduate university, as Southcom has partnered with NPS on several high-visibility initiatives including efforts to launch nano-satellites, deploy undersea sensors and employ NPS developed, advanced intelligence methodologies to disrupt transnational criminal organizations.

“Schools like NPS are invaluable to our ability [to conduct operations in Latin America],” said Kelly. “The fact that we can ask NPS to look at something specific, be it drugs, economics or other areas of interest that are beyond the scope of my staff’s expertise, is very important.”

Kelly spoke at length about the Southcom area of operations - an enormous geographic region encompassing Central America (south of Mexico), South America and the Caribbean.

“Latin America is an amazing place, there are a few countries that didn’t get the ‘peace and democracy memo,’ but most of them got it and they understand that open borders and open economies are better for their people,” said Kelly.

Kelly’s comments on everything from narco-terrorism to transnational crime and economics were described by attendees as “surprisingly candid” and offered insights into his role as one of the U.S.’ nine combatant command leaders, and on his decades-long career as both an officer and enlisted Marine.

Southcom headquarters is located in Doral, Fla. and is one of nine unified joint Combatant Commands (COCOMs) in the Department of Defense. Southcom headquarters employs more than 1,200 active duty and civilian personnel representing every branch of the U.S. military and several federal agencies.


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U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Michael Ehrlich
NSAM Wants You to Avoid Waste in Waste
By MCSN Michael Ehrlich

Naval Support Activity Monterey (NSAM) Natural Resource Specialist Todd Wills is pictured at the recycling center behind Herrmann Hall, Feb 21. Wills is working to educate NPS students, faculty and staff on base environmental policies that can save the university significant amounts of money by knowing the proper ways to recycle, reduce and reuse.

“NPS needs to know that these programs are in place, and that people should be aware of how waste from their individual departments should be processed,” said Wills.

NPS produces more than 1,300 tons of trash annually. Wills’ five-year goal is to reduce this number to less than one thousand tons. Recyclable materials like plastic, glass, metal, cardboard, paper and magazines are removed at no cost to NPS and the sale of scrap metal has even been able to generate revenue.

“So much of what we throw away could be recycled or needs to be handled as electronic waste or hazardous material,” said Wills. “Batteries, circuit boards and aerosol cans are required by law to be sorted separately, which we also do at NPS.”


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Chablis J. Torrence
NPS Multicultural Heritage Committee Celebrates Black History Month
By MC2 Chablis J. Torrence

NPS Multicultural Heritage Committee member Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danica Sirmans discusses the many milestones reached by African American Sailors during NPS' Black History Month celebration in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Auditorium, Feb. 21. The theme of this year's celebration, “Civil Rights in America,” commemorated the 50th anniversary of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.

“It was really exciting to take a moment to recognize Black history, and ultimately American history,” said Sirmans. “Civil rights aren't just for African Americans, they are something inherent to all people.”

Guest speaker and NPS Graduate School of Business and Public Policy student Lt. Temitope Ayeni reflected on the spirit and courage of past African American Sailors.

“The celebration of Black history reminds me of the significant achievements made by African American pioneers in our Navy and nation,” said Ayeni. “As I've grown older, I've begun to understand and appreciate the depth of their courage, fortitude and distinction, traits which paved the way for African Americans to serve in our Navy.

“Pioneers like Chief Petty Officer Edna Young, Chief Petty Officer John Turpin, Lt. Cmdr. Wesley Brown, Vice Adm. [Samuel] Graveley and the 'Golden Thirteen' exemplified perseverance, motivation and education,” continued Ayeni.

Every February, the Navy celebrates Black History Month by recognizing the contributions made by African American Sailors, currently representing more than 17 percent of all active duty Sailors. Originally established as Negro History Week in 1926, former President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration to Black History Month in 1976.


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Chief of Naval Research Kicks Off CEE’s Latest Innovation Workshop
By Kenneth A. Stewart

Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder kicks off the Leading Innovation: Energy Application Focus (LIEAF) seminar at the NPS Center for Executive Education (CEE), Feb. 24. The seminar brings together senior Department of Navy military and civilian leaders to discuss practices that encourage innovation with special consideration given to energy-focused applications.

“If you are trying to find one golden bullet that is going to solve all your energy problems, your missing the point … Innovation is necessary in everything from energy storage, new materials and alternatives fuels,” said Klunder. “What you do may not earn you a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but it’s all of those little things that’s going to get us there.”

NPS CEE Faculty Director of Innovation Initiatives, Dr. Neal Thornberry, is an innovation expert and one of the seminar’s principle organizers.

“The genesis of this program lies in our desire to teach the innovation skills necessary to keep us mission ready,” said Thornberry. “We hope to use this seminar to generate some new thoughts that will lead to greater mission accomplishment.”

Participants will continue to meet with innovation and energy experts throughout the week and will participate in a series of breakout sessions designed to apply the skills learned in the course to a real-time Navy challenge.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Danica M. Sirmans
Commander, U.S. Army Cyber Command Addresses NPS Students, Faculty
By MC3 Danica M. Sirmans

Commander of the U.S. Army Cyber Command Lt. Gen. Edward C. Cardon addresses NPS Cyber Academic Group faculty during a campus visit in Glasgow Hall, Feb. 25. Cardon met with NPS and Defense Language Institute students and faculty to discuss the rapidly changing domain of cyber warfare.

Navy Capt. Tim Unrien with NPS’ Information Dominance Center for Excellence welcomed Cardon.

“[Cardon’s] visit provided NPS and Defense Language Institute faculty and students a current view into the rapidly changing domain of cyber warfare,” said Unrien. “His visit was also a valuable opportunity to showcase NPS’ multi-disciplinary cyber education programs.”

Army Cyber Command is responsible for planning, directing and conducting all Army network operations, and for the defense of all Army networks. Army Cyber Command continues to evolve, but its leaders anticipate a final command strength in excess of 21,000 Soldiers and civilians.


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Philosopher’s New Book Takes a Candid Look at the Military Mind
By Javier Chagoya

Dr. Nancy Sherman, author of the book “Stoic Warriors: the Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind,” speaks to students in the NPS Department of Defense Analysis during a guest lecture, Feb. 19. Her work has received high accolades among soldiers who have returned from the battlefield, only to continue their personal struggles at home.

Sherman served as the inaugural Distinguished Chair of Ethics at the U.S. Naval Academy, and is currently a Georgetown University Professor in the Department of Philosophy. NPS Assistant Professor Bradley Strawser hosted the guest lecturer to speak to students in the university’s defense analysis programs.

“Digging down deep into one’s self and pulling up on your bootstraps is more than about sucking it up,” Sherman said, and continued by citing a specific example she details in her book.

“During a firefight in Fallujah, a young soldier dragged the remains of his partner and others from his team back to safety,” she said. “In the end, he was the only one left alive from his squad. This left the soldier torn with anguish and guilt that he wasn’t also taken with them and as a result he lashed out to everyone around him.”

Sherman said she was privileged to have significant access to the soldier’s on-going behavior after returning from the war zone, as he was married to one of her students at Georgetown. Sherman’s work describes the efforts of this and other soldiers returning from the atrocities of war, utilizing the stories and experiences to illustrate the historic relationships between stoicism, character and military culture.


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U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Shawn J. Stewart
Local Security Personnel Participate in Combined Training Exercise
By MC2 Shawn J. Stewart

Members of the Naval Support Activity Monterey (NSAM) and Presidio of Monterey Police Departments participate in active shooter training during the Navy-wide Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield exercise, Feb. 25. The Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield exercise is an annual event designed to increase the readiness of Navy security personnel.

"We coordinated our objectives well together," said City of Monterey Fire Department Division Chief Stewart Roth. "The result was an exceptional training experience; every time we do this we get better and better."

The exercise incorporated a combination of military and civilian emergency services personnel responding to the presence of a gunman at the La Mesa Village Fleet and Family Support Center.

"[The exercise] was extremely important because it gave us the opportunity to work closely with the NPS Police Department and allowed us to communicate and combine tactics,” said Officer Samantha Sanders with the Presidio of Monterey Police Department.

Presidio of Monterey Garrison Commander Col. Paul W. Fellinger agrees.

"Interoperability between Naval Support Activity Monterey and the City of Monterey is invaluable," said Fellinger. "If we do not train together, our ability to save lives will be extremely challenged in the event of an actual emergency.”


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U.S. Navy photo by Javier Chagoya
Senior Navy Space Leaders Conduct Space Systems Curricula Review
By Kenneth A. Stewart DR

NPS Research Associate Marco Ciarcia, left, a postdoctoral researcher from the National Research Council, conducts a demonstration of the Three Access Spacecraft Simulator atop a 15-ton slab of granite in the NPS Spacecraft Robotics Laboratory, Feb. 25. The demonstration was conducted for a delegation of senior Navy space leaders who visited NPS to conduct a space systems curricula review.

Research Assistant Dr. Alessio Grompone with the NPS Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering briefed the delegation, explaining the intricacies of the demonstration.

“We are currently working on collision avoidance, docking and optimal maneuvering,” said Grompone. “We are trying to learn how to dock with non-cooperative objects like debris or dead satellites.

“We are also testing our ability to incorporate robotic systems used to capture objects in space. In some cases, the robotic systems that we are testing are larger than the spacecraft that support them,” continued Grompone.

Periodic curricular reviews are conducted at NPS to ensure the university’s educational and research initiatives are aligned with the needs of its sponsors across the Department of Defense and beyond. The reviews also provide an excellent opportunity for students and faculty to showcase their work and to demonstrate NPS’ unique academic capabilities.




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Today@NPS showcases some of the speakers, conferences, experiments, lectures, and other events that take place at the Naval Postgraduate School on a daily basis. If you would like more information about any of the highlighted activities please contact the public affairs office at pao@nps.edu.

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February 2014