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Prof Paul Kapur Publishes New Pieces on India and on Stability-Instability Paradox
October 18, 2017

NSA’s Dr. S. Paul Kapur has recently had two new works published. The first is an article in this week's Foreign Policy, co-authored with Sumit Ganguly. In the article, titled “Is India Starting to Flex Its Military Muscles,” the authors discuss the summer 2017 deployment of India’s troops to the Doklam plateau near the Bhutan-China-India border to prevent China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) from constructing a road. The standoff lasted two months. The authors argue this is not another insignificant Sino-Indian spat along the border region. Instead, they believe the incident could signal changes in India’s strategic character and investigate what may have prompted India to be confrontational.  

The second piece is a chapter in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Political Behavior (edited by Dr. Fathali M. Moghaddam, also of NPS) titled “Stability-Instability Paradox.” In the chapter, Dr. Kapur explores the logic of the stability-instability paradox and its central role in nuclear deterrence. He also discusses policy challenges created by the stability-instability paradox with regard to nuclear-armed states. Finally, he explains why the stability-instability paradox will remain an inescapable problem for nuclear states in the future.

To read “Is India Starting to Flex,” click here.

To read the “Stability-Instability Paradox,” click here.

 


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NSA Alum and Professor Publish Article on Financial Sponsorship and Syrian War
October 5, 2017

NSA Professor Anne Marie Baylouny and U.S. Air Force Lt Col. Creighton Mullins, a former NSA student, have co-written an article just published in Studies in Conflict & Terrorism titled “Cash is King: Financial Sponsorship and Changing Priorities in the Syrian Civil War.” In the article, the authors consider what happens when foreign patrons provide lavish amounts of cash to rebels without mechanisms of accountability, and they analyze analyzes three major sources of funding and their micro-level effects on insurgent-groups in the Syrian civil war. Through this sponsorship, funders promote Islamist ideologies and regional issues over local issues.

A 2015 graduate, Mullins received the prestigious Ellis Island Medal of Honor by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations (NECO) in May 2015. This isn’t the first co-authored article for Mullins. He also co-authored an article with the NSA Professor Mohammed Hafez in 2015, “The Radicalization Puzzle,” which explores radicalization of individuals in Western societies, also published in Studies in Conflict & Terrorism (read here). 

To read “Cash is King,” click here

 


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CHDS Director Glen Woodbury Awarded by NEMA
October 4, 2017

The National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) has presented Glen Woodbury, Director of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) the 2017 Lacy E. Suiter Distinguished Service Award. This award is given to individuals who have made cumulative outstanding contributions to the field of emergency management. An Army veteran, CHDS graduate, past president of NEMA, and former director of Emergency Management Division for Washington state, Glen Woodbury has been in the field of emergency management for more than 25 year. CHDS, where Woodbury is not only the director but also teaches, has a number programs focused on assisting homeland security leaders develop policies, strategies, programs, and organizational elements needed to defeat terrorism and to prepare for and respond to natural disasters and public safety threats across the United States. 

To read more, click here

 



NSA Alumus Promoted and Published
October 3, 2017

Col. Michael Fenzel (US Army), who defended his Ph.D. dissertation in the NSA Department in 2013 ("No Retreat: the Failure of Soviet Decision-making in the Afghan War, 1979-1989"), has been promoted to brigadier general (BG). His next assignment will be in Afghanistan. Based on the dissertation, his book, No Miracles: The Failure of Soviet Decision-Making in the Afghan War is being published by Stanford University Press (November 2017).

In his book, BG Fenzel explores why and how that although the Soviet Union's senior leaders had become aware that their strategy in Afghanistan was unraveling, their operational and tactical methods were not working, and the sacrifices they were demanding from the Soviet people and military were unlikely to produce the forecasted results, operations in Afghanistan persisted for four more years. For more information about his book, click here.

 

 

 


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NSA’s Scott Jasper Advocates for Active Cyber Defense in The Diplomat
August 7, 2017

NSA’s Scott Jasper recently had an article published in The Diplomat in which he advocates the use of active cyber defense as an answer to cyber threats, such as those emanating from Russia or North Korea. A strategy of active cyber defense combines internal systemic resilience to halt cyber attack progress with external disruption capacities to thwart a malicious actors’ objectives. Jasper argues active cyber defense will be more effective than economic sanctions or diplomatic expulsions.

To read the article, click here

 


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Dr. Tsypkin Honored for 30 Years of Service
July 19, 2017

NSA’s Dr. Mikhail “Misha” Tsypkin was honored by NPS recently for his 30 years of service. Dr. Tsypkin, who is the Academic Associate for three NSA curricula (249, 684, and 688), has been teaching at NPS since 1987. Professor Mohammed Hafez, the Chair of the NSA Department, said, “Professor Tsypkin has been a great mentor to our students over the decades, seeing some develop into admirals and military leaders here at home and abroad.” Tsypkin is an expert on Russia, an area of growing importance today, and the NSA Department thanks him for his service to the department, NPS, and our students. 

For information on the award ceremony, click here.

 

 


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NSA Department Celebrates June Graduation
June 22, 2017

Graduating students from the National Security Affairs Department gather with several of their professors for a group portrait on the steps of Herrmann Hall, June 16. A total of 45 students received their Master of Arts in Security Studies, including officers from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, Army, and Air Force and from Germany, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Pakistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Kenya, Mexico, and Uganda. The NSA Department congratulates its most recent group of graduates and wishes them all the best.

 


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NSA’s Dr. Young Publishes on Sociology of Command in CEE
By Dr. Thomas-Durell Young
May 25, 2017

 

NSA’s Dr. Thomas-Durell Young has published an article on the Sociology of Command in Central and Eastern Europe. From the abstract, Dr. Young explores the elements of the Communist concept of command continue to ramify throughout Central and Eastern European armed forces. These elements inhibit the orderly delegation of command, the consistent creation of defense capabilities, and the professional development of commanders and managers; they also impede these armed services from adopting the concepts of authority, accountability, and responsibility—concepts taken for granted in Western defense institutions.

 

To read the article, please click here.


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Dr. Dahl Publishes Article on Improving Intelligence Analysis through the Use of Case Studies
May 24, 2017

NSA’s Dr. Erik Dahl has recently published an article in Intelligence and National Security entitled “Getting beyond Analysis by Anecdote: Improving Intelligence Analysis through the Use of Case Studies.” Dahl argues that although American intelligence officials have been trying since the 9/11 attacks to improve the quality of their analysis, they have so far failed to make much use of one of the most common methods used in the social science: case study analysis. Through better use of case studies, Dahl believes, the intelligence community will be able to help policymakers as they wrestle with the many challenges facing the country. 

Dahl says he also had a second reason for writing the article: to help NPS students understand what a case study is and how they can use case studies more effectively in their own master’s theses and other work. “My students often ask me,” Dahl said, “How long should a case study be?  How do I do one? How many case studies do I need in my thesis? I hope that this article can help them answer some of those questions.”

To read the article, click here

 


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NSA's Malian Students Featured in Weekly
April 10, 2017

NSA’s students from Mali have been featured in a recent edition of the Monterey Weekly. The eight students have come from Mali’s Ministries of Defense, Justice, Foreign Affairs and Finance and Security to attend a master’s program at the Naval Postgraduate School. Their government has tasked them with developing a new interagency group to address terrorism.

To read the story, click here.

 


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NSA Professors Tenured and Promoted
April 6, 2017

NSA department congratulates two professors, Dr. Naazneen Barma and Dr. Zachary Shore, who have been tenured and promoted. 

Dr. Barma’s is an outstanding professor with wide-ranging scholarship in the fields of post-conflict peace building and democratic governance. Her work has been widely praised for its theoretical insights, empirical rigor, and potential to inform policy debates. Dr. Barma’s book The Peacebuilding Puzzle is a singular contribution that challenges international institutions to think differently about post-conflict interventions and governance in fragile states. NSA Chair, Dr. Mohammed Hafez, had this to say about her cumulative contributions: “Dr. Barma has set a high bar for future tenure candidates in the NSA department, and she is the new gold standard by which their measure will be assayed.” 

Prof. Shore’s analysis of foreign policy decision making in times of peace and war has been recognized as groundbreaking and analytically innovative. His theory of pattern breaks, based on the melding of cognitive psychology with historical analysis, is simply brilliant and has been recognized as such by historians, political scientists, and even military leaders like Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster. He shows that to really understand one's rival, do not just look for patterns in foreign policy behavior, but observe pattern breaks during times of crises. Departure from normal operating procedures can tell us a lot about what our rivals value the most. His book is as an important corrective to the conventional wisdom on how to study foreign policy decision making. 

 

 


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NSA’s Dr. Kapur Published New Article in Foreign Affairs
By Catherine L. Grant
March 16, 2017

NSA’s Dr. S. Paul Kapur, along with Sumit Ganguly, has authored a new article that appeared in the 14 March issue of Foreign Affairs. As India’s fleet of MiG 21s is aging, it is seeking a replacement jet. In the article, the authors state there are two options for replacement under consideration, the Lockheed Martin’s F-16 Fighting Falcon and Saab’s JAS 39 Gripen. According to the authors, Indian leaders would like the plane they choose to be manufactured in India, and Lockheed Martin is willing to move its entire production line from Texas to India. The authors explore the potential benefits to both the United States and India that such a move would entail.

To read the article, click here.


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NSA Student and Professor Publish on Foreign Fighters
February 23, 2017

A former NSA student, Sean C. Reynolds, and NSA Professor Mohammed Hafez have just published an empirical study entitled “Social Network Analysis of German Foreign Fighters in Syria and Iraq” in the journal Terrorism and Political Violence. In the article, the authors examine the question why do Westerners become foreign fighters in civil conflicts. They explore this question through original data collection on German foreign fighters in Syria and Iraq, and test three sets of hypotheses that revolve around socioeconomic integration, online radicalization, and social network mobilization. The authors find only modest support for the integration deficit hypothesis and meager support for the social media radicalization theory. Instead, the preponderance of evidence suggests that interpersonal ties largely drive the German foreign fighter phenomenon. Recruitment featured clustered mobilization and bloc recruitment within interconnected radical milieus, leading the authors to conclude that peer-to-peer networks are the most important mobilization factor for German foreign fighters.

To read the article, click here.

 


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NSA’s Dr. Chris Matei Explores Chilean Intelligence after Pinochet
By Catherine L. Grant
February 15, 2017

NSA’s Dr. Cris Matei, along with coauthor Dr. Andrés de Castro García, has recently had an article published in International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence. The article, titled “Chilean Intelligence after Pinochet: Painstaking Reform of an Inauspicious Legacy,” explores whether Chile is a successful case of intelligence democratization. To answer questions such as have Chile’s intelligence agencies successfully wiped out the stigma associated with the former military dictatorship’s ruthless past and has Chile established both transparent and effective intelligence agencies, fostering the development of an intelligence culture in the country, the authors first discuss the historical background of the Chilean military dictatorship and the role of intelligence. Moreover, they also discuss efforts of successive post-Pinochet governments regarding intelligence democratization and also whether Chile has achieved progress in institutionalizing its intelligence culture.

To read the article, click here.

 


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NSA’s Dr. Meierding Has New Article on Joint Development in the South China Sea
By Catherine L. Grant
February 13, 2017

Dr. Emily Meierding's article “Joint Development in the South China Sea: Exploring the Prospects of Oil and Gas Cooperation between Rivals” was published in the February 2017 issue of Energy Research & Social Science. The article evaluates whether the South China Sea’s littoral states can cooperatively manage the region’s contested oil and natural gas resources. By examining historical intergovernmental joint development agreements (JDAs), it argues that the prospects for significant hydrocarbon cooperation are slim under current political conditions, as rival states rarely establish such accords. Moreover, creating JDAs is insufficient to prompt actual co-development of shared oil and gas deposits or improvements in states’ broader relations. Nonetheless, hydrocarbon agreements do have one important positive impact. They prevent resource-related militarized confrontations, thereby reducing the risk of territorial dispute escalation. This incentive, alone, could prompt the South China Sea’s claimant states to negotiate JDAs and third party states to encourage these efforts.

To read the article, click here.

 


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Lt. Cassingham, Former NSA Grad, Receives Award for Work on China’s Dredging
By Catherine L. Grant
January 18, 2017

After graduating with his Master of Arts with a focus Southeast Asia, former NSA student Lt. Grant Cassingham, an officer in the information warfare community, completed a project for the NPS Littoral Operations Center (LOC) while waiting for his follow-on orders. Under the direction of Navy Capt. (ret) Wayne Porter, Director of LOC, Lt. Cassingham researched, compiled, and vetted a list of more than 260 vessels and 60 ownership companies associated with China’s dredging operations in the South China Sea. Earning him a NAM, the lieutenant’s work impressed not only Director Porter, but also Commander, Naval Surface Forces, Vice Admiral Thomas Rowden.  

To read more, click here.


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NSA Profs. Barma and Piombo Publish Jointly in International Peacekeeping
December 6, 2016

Two NSA faculty, Profs. Naazneen Barma and Jessica Piombo, have authored an article with Naomi Levy of Santa Clara University, titled “Disentangling Aid Dynamics in Statebuilding and Peacebuilding: A Causal Framework.” It was published in the most recent issue of International Peacekeeping. In the article, the authors propose disentangling the endeavors of peacebuilding and statebuilding, which though recent scholarship has acknowledged have distinct goals, it has lacked the knowledge of the mechanisms by which external engagement leads to specific outcomes. The authors propose a new causal framework, with specific variables, to understand the effects of aid dynamics on state coherence and the depth of peace.  

To read the article, click here.


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NSA Prof. Ostovar Publishes on Iran's Foreign Policy in the Middle East
By Catherine Grant
December 5, 2016

NSA Prof. Afshon Ostovar has written several articles regarding foreign policy in the Middle East. In his most recent publication, Sectarian Dilemmas in Iranian Foreign Policy, published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (November 2016), Prof. Ostovar argues that Iran's foreign policy is a product of it's self-interest, and that approach can look aggressive, and pragmatic, but it also has a sectarian angle too. He discusses how religious identity and beliefs also take part in Iran's foreign policy approach. Furthermore, Prof. Ostovar explores Iran's policies in the broader context of the expansion of sectarianism across the Middle East.

In the second article, “From Tehran to Mosul: Iran and the Middle East's Great Game,” Prof. Ostovar discusses the serious complications for the region once ISIS is driven out of Mosul. In particular, he discusses the perspectives and interests of Iran and Turkey. He concludes by noting that although the region’s major players do want to see the city liberated, in a post-ISIS Mosul “intersecting Turkish, Kurdish, and Shiite claims to Mosul and its surrounding areas, combined with political rivalries at home, might make that balancing act difficult to maintain.” 

To read Sectarian Dilemmas in Iranian Foeign Policy, click here.

To read the article "From Tehran to Mosul," click here.


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Prof Tom Young on Challenges in Post-Communist European Defense Institutions
By Catherine L. Grant
December 4, 2016

Dr. Tom Young has recently published two articles related to challenges of reform in post-Communist European defense institutions. The first, “The Challenge of Reforming European Communist Legacy ‘Logistics,’” was published in August in The Journal of Slavic Military Studies. In the article, Dr. Young explains there are challenges of why progress of logistics reform in post-Communist-legacy defense institutions has been slow. His first argument is that a significant impediment to logistics reform is a lack of appreciation by officials, particularly from the West, of how antithetical to Western counterparts the legacy logistics concepts are. His second argument is “reform of legacy logistics organizations will not follow from attention and resources directed at tactical-level formations and importing the expeditionary logistics concept.”

 

The second article, titled “Impediments to Reform in European Post-Communist Defense Institutions” and published in October in Problems of Post-Communism, makes similar arguments. In this article, Dr. Young explains why Western democratic and communist defense military concepts are antithetical. He also provides evidence demonstrating legacy concepts to be “very much both actively and passively evident in European post-communist defense institutions.” 

 

The third article, titled "Is the US's PPBS Applicable to European Post-Communist Defence Institutions?" and published in December in The Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) Journal, focuses on the attempt to plan and create a modern financial system in Central and Eastern Europe using exported versions of the Department of Defense's planning, programming, and budgeting systems (PPBS). The goal of producing viable defence plans was unsuccessful due to a lack of policy. In this publication, Dr. Durell Young argues that policy (and its influence over programming) is the only way to plan and create a successful system.

 

To read “The Challenge of Reforming European Communist Legacy ‘Logistics,’” click here.

To read “Impediments to Reform in European Post-Communist Defense Institutions,” click here.

To read "Is the US's PPBS Applicable to European Post-Communist Defence Institutions?," clear here.

 


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Dr. Moltz Publishes Chapter on Asian Space Rivalry and Cooperative Institutions
By Dr. Clay Moltz
November 20, 2016

Dr. Clay Moltz has a chapter, titled “Asian Space Rivalry and Cooperative Institutions: Mind the Gap,” in the new book, Asian Designs: Governance in the Contemporary World Order, published by published by Cornell University Press.

With the rapid growth of interest in space activity within Asia, this study examines the prospects for increasing international cooperation. After discussing relevant conceptual issues, it surveys the space policies particularly of China, India, and Japan and examines the historical, technological, and political factors that have impeded space collaboration to date. It then examines the largely competitive roots of the two main regional space organizations: the Chinese-led Asia-Pacific Space Cooperation Organization (APSCO) and the Japanese-led Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum (APRSAF). Dr. Moltz concludes that, despite the rising threat of regional conflict over space, a highly competitive and under-institutionalized environment can be expected in the future, unless new openness, reduced tensions, or the emergence of shared threats (such as orbital debris) change current nationalist approaches to space.

To read more about the book, click here.

 


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Latest News

Prof Paul Kapur Publishes New Pieces on India and on Stability-Instability Paradox
NSA’s Dr. S. Paul Kapur has recently had two new works published. The first is an article in this week's Foreign Policy, co-authored with Sumit Ganguly. In the article, titled “Is India Starting to Fl... Read More

NSA Alum and Professor Publish Article on Financial Sponsorship and Syrian War
NSA Professor Anne Marie Baylouny and U.S. Air Force Lt Col. Creighton Mullins, a former NSA student, have co-written an article just published in Studies in Conflict & Terrorism titled “Cash is K... Read More

CHDS Director Glen Woodbury Awarded by NEMA
The National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) has presented Glen Woodbury, Director of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) the 2017 Lacy E. Suiter Distinguished Service Award. T... Read More

NSA Alumus Promoted and Published
Col. Michael Fenzel (US Army), who defended his Ph.D. dissertation in the NSA Department in 2013 ("No Retreat: the Failure of Soviet Decision-making in the Afghan War, 1979-1989"), has been promoted t... Read More

NSA’s Scott Jasper Advocates for Active Cyber Defense in The Diplomat
NSA’s Scott Jasper recently had an article published in The Diplomat in which he advocates the use of active cyber defense as an answer to cyber threats, such as those emanating from Russia or North K... Read More

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